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  1. #1

    Default Coil red hot- no start

    Hi guys, need your insight. I bought the car a couple weeks ago, and it stalled on me this past week at a idle. Would not restart. Cranked engine over and car backfired thru the intake. Checked voltages at battery and key on ignition, 12 bolts at battery and 9volts at coil. Ran a fused wire to +coil directly from battery and only got to ten volts. Coil overheated and started to boil yay the top. I know I must have a direct short somewhere. The wiring was suspect so I pulled one wire at a time going to coil and distributor and used wire connectors. The previous owner was a hack and had twisted wires together with electrical tape. Car has a duralast gold distributor, and I took apart wires one at a time but could have easily wired one backwards. Car will crank but not run. Disconnected battery cables so I did not explode coil. I can provide pictures if need be. Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    FEP Member
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    Oct 2017
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    Default

    Would help to know what car you're working on?

    Disconnect any wiring on the low voltage side of the coil. If you run a fused wire directly from battery to the positive side of the coil with nothing connected to the negative terminal, no current should flow. If the coil overheats, sounds like a bad coil.

    If the coil stays cool, lay the high voltage lead connected to the coil near a ground. Hook up a jumper wire to the negative side of the coil. If you tap the jumper to ground, should get a nice blue spark from the HV lead to ground. Don't leave the jumper tied to ground.

    Please post your results.

  3. #3
    FEP Supporter Broncojunkie's Avatar
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    79 Pace Car - 331, t5
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkd0r View Post
    Would help to know what car you're working on?

    Disconnect any wiring on the low voltage side of the coil. If you run a fused wire directly from battery to the positive side of the coil with nothing connected to the negative terminal, no current should flow. If the coil overheats, sounds like a bad coil.

    If the coil stays cool, lay the high voltage lead connected to the coil near a ground. Hook up a jumper wire to the negative side of the coil. If you tap the jumper to ground, should get a nice blue spark from the HV lead to ground. Don't leave the jumper tied to ground.

    Please post your results.

    I apologize, it’s a 1984 mustang lx 5.0

  5. #5
    FEP Member
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    Oct 2017
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    Have you made any progress?

  6. #6

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    9 volts at the coil sounds about right. There is a resistance wire that drops the voltage to the coil (it is the rubbery feeling one). 12 volts direct will boil the coil especially if you run it hot to the battery.

    Take everything back to stock. Pull the coil wire off the cap, insert a spare spark plug in it and ground it. It should spark when the engine turns. If it does, then your issue is cap/rotor or timing. If it doesn't spark, I usually start off on the Duraspark Box (a known failure point, especially if they die when hot then restart). You might have cooked that coil, so you might need to start with the coil.

    Kenny

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