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  1. #1

    Default Pennsylvania Classic Vehicle Registration...Anyone?

    I'm curious if anyone on here has their Mustang (or any other vehicle for that matter) registered in PA as a classic or antique. I'm considering going this route with my '86 (over 15 years can be registered as classic) to get around the emissions inspection. While it's not a daily driver, I don't want to be too limited to the amount of time I drive it. According to the PA website, a classic can be used for "occassional driving" which in their definition is shows and events, or "one day a week". I was hoping someone could tell me if they've had any harassment for stretching that limit...

    Any feedback?
    '86 GT Convertible
    Under Construction

  2. #2

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    I thought of doing that also. I heard different points of view on doing it
    1983 Capri RS Turbo
    1986 Bronco 351ho
    VP Berks County Mustang Car Club
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2462250

  3. #3

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    I considered the plate as well. 1st however I would have to give up my personalized plate and 2nd I keep under 5,000 miles a year so emissions is not an issue.

    I do drive my car to work a lot in the summer, take the same road, see the same cop in the same spot most moring on my 12 mile drive. I thought, is he going to put that together and care enough to get me for it? I dunno, but decided against it for the other reasons. You likely can get away with it if you ignore the spirit of the requirements.

  4. #4

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    I'll likely stay under the 5k number as well. My problem is getting past the first inspection (bought the car in GA so need to get it inspected when I register)...
    '86 GT Convertible
    Under Construction

  5. #5
    FEP Power Member pextor's Avatar
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    funny, I brought my 86 GT vert from GA to PA as well.

    Mine is stock though engine-wise, so inspection wasn't and isn't a problem.

    I thought about doing the classic tags too, and I may still do them.

    what's holding your car back from passing PA inspection?
    1999 SE sedan - 5-speed, Amazon green with med. prairie tan interior. needs waxed.

    1998 ZX2 - silver with gray interior. needs cleaned.

  6. #6
    FEP Supporter PaceFever79's Avatar
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    I have classic plates on my '79. No emissions test, and lifetime registration (never needs renewed)
    and the cool Classic Car plate were selling points. I've never had an issue from cops over driving it
    recreationally, I drive it a few times a week during the non winter months, less than 5000 miles per
    year. They did make me submit pictures of the car and they rejected my first application because it
    was a hot rod (it had Draglite wheels and some stickers on the quarter windows). So I removed the
    stickers and took pictures of the car with Pony Wheels and wrote a letter explaining it was a limited
    edition Indy Pace Car model, and they approved my classic tags. I was also able to get way cheaper
    full coverage insurance on the car as a classic/collector car.

  7. #7

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    The first emissions inspection is only a visual. I know I had to put a cat on
    1983 Capri RS Turbo
    1986 Bronco 351ho
    VP Berks County Mustang Car Club
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2462250

  8. #8

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    I just put antique plates on my 84. As previously stated...lifetime registration and no more yearly inspections. I plan on doing the same wih my 85's next year.

    I don't know what the benefit of the Classic tags is.....I thought they still needed a yearly inspection??? I could be wrong.

  9. #9
    FEP Supporter PaceFever79's Avatar
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    Classic is lifetime registration, safety inspection required, no emissions required. The main
    difference between the Classic and Antique is the Antique has greater restriction on the type
    of driving you can do. I think that Antique registered vehicles are not supposed to be driven
    after dark, and mainly to or from shows or club events. I've never heard of anyone getting
    hassled over driving a properly tagged Antique vehicle. But they do look out for people that
    register old but common vehicles as Antique for special benefits.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by mapandjlp View Post
    I don't want to be too limited to the amount of time I drive it. According to the PA website, a classic can be used for "occassional driving" which in their definition is shows and events, or "one day a week". I was hoping someone could tell me if they've had any harassment for stretching that limit...

    Any feedback?
    Your concerns are valid...

    1. Why would you want to "stretch" that limit? It is what it is. Use it for it's intended purpose. If you are not going to use it for it's intended purpose, then maybe it's not the registration for you.

    2. There are consequences. If something happens, you get into an accident for example, or even serious hurt someone, and you are using the vehicle outside it's intended purpose, your insurance company may leave you high & dry and you could end up being sued. Believe me, they WILL investigate usage, location, to and from, mileage, vehicle modifications, etc.

    2B. Not only that, another side note when it comes to registering a "classic" in the state of PA is, the car MUST BE stock and original condition with little or no modifications. So all the stories you hear about guys who slap stock wheels on their 83 GT for the photos, while they have a built 306 with 4:11 gears, is basically fraud. You see it all the time at PA car cruises, heavily modified cars with classic tags. Well guess what? If anything were to happen, you are in deep sh*t.

    3. The correct way to register a modified 80's fox body in PA is a "collector" registration. Just like a Classic registration, this is a lifetime registration and only requires a yearly safety inspection and no emissions. This is for vehicles with engine, exhaust, and other modifications that differ from the manufacturers specs. This way you cover your @ss. The only downside to this registration is, the title becomes a Reconstructed title.

  11. #11
    FEP Supporter PaceFever79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CapriEnvy View Post
    The only downside to this registration is, the title becomes a Reconstructed title.
    The only downside?

    I can't justify doing anything that involves a reconstructed title.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by CapriEnvy View Post
    This way you cover your @ss. The only downside to this registration is, the title becomes a Reconstructed title.
    While I agree with you up to this point, the collectable registration has the same restrictions as antique and classic regrading usage. The Collectable registration was really a push from the "Pro Street" type guys that couldnt qualify for the other plates based on age but it didnt change the ground rules.

    http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms.../fs-colveh.pdf

    As you mentioned, I don't know of many people that have applied for Classic plates that didnt have it returned at least once based on something that needed explanation (and even documetation). A guy I know had his SVO application returned for a windshield banner (removed it) and "aftermarket spoiler" He sent in numerous copies of dealer / factory literature to prove that was original on the car.

    Bob Myers

  13. #13
    FEP Supporter PaceFever79's Avatar
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    The rules for Classic Car registration are not super restrictive. You can rebuild your 302 with various internal
    upgrades and do other mild "resto-mod" upgrades. As long as the car is substantially (meaning, for the most
    part, not entirely) maintained in conformance to original specifications.

    They also give you lots of options for driving/enjoying your car. Mainly, you are not allowed to use it for daily
    transportation. As long as you have another car with normal registration as your daily driver you are fine. As
    for insurance companies, they are all scam artists looking to wiggle out of any claim the can. I learned that a
    few times the hard way. Specialty cars should have specialty insurance (through Haggerty, etc). The specialty
    insurance providers have a reputation to uphold in the community.

    <snip from DMV fact sheet>

    DEFINITION OF ANTIQUE AND CLASSIC MOTOR VEHICLES

    Antique Motor Vehicle - A motor vehicle, but not a reproduction thereof, manufactured more than 25 years
    prior to thecurrent year which has been maintained in or restored to a condition which is substantially in
    conformance with manufacturer specifications.

    Classic Motor Vehicle - A motor vehicle, but not a reproduction thereof, manufactured at least 15 years prior
    to the current year which has been maintained in or restored to a condition which is substantially in
    conformity with manufacturer specifications and appearance.

    USE OF ANTIQUE AND CLASSIC REGISTRATION PLATES

    The use of antique and classic plates is governed by Section 1340 of the Pennsylvania Vehicle Code which
    states: It is unlawful for any person to operate a motorcycle or vehicle with antique and classic registration
    plates for general daily transportation. Permitted use shall be limited to participation in club activities, exhibits,
    tours, parades, occasional transportation and similar uses. Occasional transportation and similar uses is defined
    as one day a week.

    PA DOT PDF - http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms...ets/fs-ant.pdf

  14. #14
    FEP Supporter mmb617's Avatar
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    I have a classic tag on my '85. I bought the car out of state and it wasn't close to being legal for our emissions inspection, so that was the easy way to go.

    It's hit or miss what they will accept or reject when you first apply for the tags. The car has to appear to be in excellent stock condition as you must submit pictures of the front, back and both sides. My first application was denied because I had Weld wheels on the car and a non-stock hood scoop, plus they didn't feel the paint was in good enough condition and it was a non-stock color.

    I removed the hood scoop, and repainted the car in the factory color, then put the wheels from my wife's '87 LX on it. They weren't the right wheels for the car but they had the Ford logo on them so I guess they assumed they were stock. They also didn't catch that the rear spoiler wasn't the right one for the '85 model year. After these changes, I got the tags. Next year the car will be old enough to transfer over to antique tags, and I intend to do that just so I don't have the hassle of the yearly safety inspection. I keep up my own car and don't need to pay someone to inspect it each year.

    As for useage, I am pretty much in compliance since the car is driven for pleasure only, about one day a week. Usually this day is at the drag strip, but it's trailered to and from so that shouldn't even count. It isn't even driven 1k miles per year on the street. Most of the street driving is just to and from cruise-ins.

    If you wanted to get fussy about it you could point out that the engine and interior isn't what came from the factory, but if I change out my cowl hood for the stocker that I kept, the car still looks pretty much stock from the outside.

    I see plenty of cars at the strip and cruise-ins that are similar in modifications to mine with both classic and antique plates, and have yet to hear of anybody having a problem because of it.

    I often hear it said that antique tagged vehicles can't be driven after dark. I guess it's subject to interpretation, but the way I read that section if your vehicle meets modern day lighting requirements you are fine. It's the really older vehicles that the factory lights aren't up to today's standards that are limited to daylight driving. Not that I drive my car at night either, but that's just the way I read it.

    If your car appears stock from the exterior, and you are at least resonably close to meeting the useage requirements, I'd go for it.
    408/T5/3.73's

    Old Fart Drag Racing. (OFR)

    We're not fast racers, we're more what's known as half fast racers.

    If you're not having fun you're probably taking this stuff too seriously.

  15. #15

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    Wow, this has turned into a good debate. My '86 does and will appear stock outside and in. The only non-stock item will be the engine. I'm working on a build off the original block that will include TFS heads, aftermarket intake, cam, and the usual exhaust upgrades. It won't be a strip car, just for fun on the street.

    As for stretching the limit, I just don't want to have to pick which day I can jump in and take a ride. If I feel like going for a spin, I'm going to do it.

    Oh, and reconstructed title isn't an option for me either...
    '86 GT Convertible
    Under Construction

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