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  1. #1

    Default A rare find, '80 convertible (not Intermeccanica)

    Never ever heard about this one.
    It's a 1980 convertible made by Tomaso USA, #026.

    Interior is Ghia with white leather seats and door inserts, blue dashboard/console.
    Different from the Intermeccanica one, this one still has its back seats.
    Top looks like from a Mercerdes 450.

    Options are Power Brakes, Power steering, Cruise Control, SelectAire.
    Engine is the cool old 200ci with automatic trans.

    Car was found in Paris (yes, there are Mustangs in France ). I was about to buy it but it's too bad shape for the price asked (lot of structural rust under paint, top to be changed, no rear on trans).






  2. #2

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    http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/...n/message/4963

    That is a pretty comprehensive writeup on all pre asc verts.

    In a prior note, I mentioned the "Swift Edition by Tomaso" as well as
    an "American Pullman" Edition. Since that time, I have learned
    exactly what this was. Neither company had anything to do with the
    making of these cars. They were mearly middle-men or thinly
    disguised vendors masquerading as manufacturers. They, (probably
    along with many others that I have not found) were merely fronting
    for a company called "Classic Coachworks, Inc." of Orlando
    Florida. "C.C." was the actual manufacturer of this product that went
    by whatever name the vendor decided to call it. Tomaso of America
    (11125 Arcade / {POB # 5692} of Little Rock, Ark 72216 (501) 227-0284
    was one of the dealers down south. The President at the time was a
    Russell E. Swift as well his brother Tom Swift. Therefore they
    called theirs the "Swift~Edition".
    -Mike

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the link, wasn't aware of this group.
    This write up is very interesting, there's not so much litterature on those pre-83 convertibles. The only one a knew before the McLaren was the Intermeccanica.

    Always time to learn something.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by TuxStang
    Thanks for the link, wasn't aware of this group.
    This write up is very interesting, there's not so much litterature on those pre-83 convertibles. The only one a knew before the McLaren was the Intermeccanica.

    Always time to learn something.
    Hardly any. You have pictures of the only swift I have seen.

    -Mike

  5. #5

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    I have 2 press release 8x10 black & white glossys issued from Swift. Sadly, I paid ALOT for them. Swift sold the rights to SELL the car to any number of companies. Don't be surprised one day to find another company, located in Manhattan, NYC who also sold them, under yet another name, that I right now forget. It all instantly dropped dead in September of 1982 when Ford brought back its own convertible Mustang. These Mustang customs began in 1980, hit a high water mark in 1981 & 1982 and crashed like the stock market in 1983.
    1990 ascMcLaren - Azura Blue - 2,033 miles
    1990 ascMcLaren - Sterling Silver - 7,237 miles
    (1 of 2 "Silver Anniversary Editions" Manufactured)
    1986 ascMclaren Coupe - Charcoal - 688 miles
    1993 Cadillac Sixty Special - Midnight Plum Purple 9,785 miles
    2003 Lincoln Town Car LTD Edition- Silver-Green 11,667 miles
    2001 Jeep Cherokee (XJ) Limited "Final-500 Edition" 4X4 45,002 miles
    2/25/'08

  6. #6

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    Found this on the "Swift"...but it is a 1979.

    1979 Mustang Cobra Turbo
    1978 Mustang II T-Top
    1979 F250 4X4 6" lift
    1974 K5 Blazer 4X4 Convertible
    1978 Malibu Landau
    1994 Crown Vic
    1999 Crown Vic LX
    1985 Z28 T-Top
    1984 Bronco II 2.8 Auto 4X4
    2007 Torch Red Mustang GT

  7. #7
    FEP Super Member anthonydalrymple's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboCobra
    Found this on the "Swift"...but it is a 1979.

    Whoa! That looks just like the one i saw in the junkyard a couple months ago. Door tag was for an '80. Unusual cast aluminum pieces on top of the cut(rather sloppily I might add)rear quarter panels. I'd have seriously thought about "saving" it if it wern't for all the unusual "one-off" parts that were damaged & probably close to impossible to replace.....
    '89 5.0 5-speed 'vert, seeing rust for the 1st time in it's life as well as 4,500+ elevation....

  8. #8
    racingpenguin
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    Hi I am new the site and I came across this forum. I recently aquired a 1980 mustang convertible from my father in law. he bought from a guy back in 1991 and it has been sitting since. he was the second owner of the car and it has been sitting in the garage all this time. I came across the intermeccina websit and they had a illustration of the support braces as same as i have on the car. I was wondering what type of car value these car are worth. The car is in fair to good condition with no rust on the car. The car is in pieces as he was putting a 5.0 in it to replace the 4 banger. If the value is good I might tackle the job providing I can find all of the parts. Any info on helping me decide on this job.(Time factor and a place to work on it not a problem for me)

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by racingpenguin
    Hi I am new the site and I came across this forum. I recently aquired a 1980 mustang convertible from my father in law. he bought from a guy back in 1991 and it has been sitting since. he was the second owner of the car and it has been sitting in the garage all this time. I came across the intermeccina websit and they had a illustration of the support braces as same as i have on the car. I was wondering what type of car value these car are worth. The car is in fair to good condition with no rust on the car. The car is in pieces as he was putting a 5.0 in it to replace the 4 banger. If the value is good I might tackle the job providing I can find all of the parts. Any info on helping me decide on this job.(Time factor and a place to work on it not a problem for me)
    They get a bit more than your average Mustang. Because they weren't that well known and popular...and not really Ford approved, they simply don't get the bump in price you would think.

    Plus anything before 85 (save the 79 pace car or 82GT) doesn't seem to get much action compared to the 85-86 cars where HP became king again....and those are the cars people want.

    If it was 100% original and PERFECT, with rasonably low miles, you would get the most out of it maybe $6k give or take.

    If it's in OK shape and modified, maybe 2500-3k to the right person. If it's highly modifed like you spent 8k on quality upgrades and another 4k body and paint job...and the car looked perfect...mayb 4-5k tops.

    Mostly guessing on my part. There are so few to judge values by, but that is the feeling I get from what currently sells.

    -Mike

  10. #10
    FEP Super Member anthonydalrymple's Avatar
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    I think Mike nailed the value(s) of these rare car's & the reasons for why they don't command good money pretty well
    .
    They are pretty much only valued by foxbody fanatic's; like ourselves on this wonderful site. It's neat to see them at a car show or going down the street. Swift ownership would make for an interesting conversation topic at a car show & turn heads on the street with the top up(most identifing characteristic of those Swifts are thier top). I have never seen one yet at a show or on the street & I live in a car nut state like California(no rust problems either to destroy them). I have seen only 1 or maybe 2 in the junkyards in my entire life. So, if you have the time, the money, want something nobody else has, the only unique vehicle at a car gathering or show? Then you definetly found the right car to restore & enjoy....
    '89 5.0 5-speed 'vert, seeing rust for the 1st time in it's life as well as 4,500+ elevation....

  11. #11

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    I think there was one really sweet low mileage one on ebay. It was red, nearly 100% original and was an original v8 car.

    I think it was pushing over $6k in price....but struggling to get much higher.

    I think the v8 helped it immensely. Unfortunately, v8s are VERY rare in these cars....a converted fully loaded v8 car was simply too costly to sell. SO they used mostly 6cylinder cars to shave some money off.

    -Mike

  12. #12
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    Hey cant anyone see my pics look at doc23317 and click on pics

  13. #13
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    check out doc 23317 pics tomaso swift edition #47 of 400 made Might be selling it soon if anyone is interested, let me know.Thanks Doc
    Last edited by doc23317; 11-27-2009 at 08:51 PM.

  14. #14
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    Gentlemen, may I jumpstart this excellent dialog from 4 years ago?


    True, the aftermarket convertibles were unattractive jokes after Ford announced they were resuming convertible production for 1983. But given the quality of most of them - and given the quality of Ford's then-recent offerings with flimsy bodies, plastic interiors, etc. - Ford didn't need the added insult of being maligned with the cheesy quality of these aftermarket convertibles, while trying to persuade America that "At Ford Quality Is Job #1". But if you look back in history, custom coachbuilding always takes a generation or three to become fully appreciated. And in that sense I'm satisfied these aftermarkets - even the crummier ones that did little but remove the sedan roof and snap a crude fabric top onto the body - will come into their own as another form of American automotive ingenuity.


    Back in 1970 I engineered the first 1960 Edsel convertible constructed from a '60 Ford Sunliner. And forty years later the differences between the conversions and the originals have been lost to time and all are equally desirable, as demonstrated by world-wide price and demand.


    Last year I bought a 1982 Intermeccanica C'abrio. Last Friday I replaced the brakes and transmission and finally drove it for the first time. WOW! The body integrity which IM added into this car's floors, A and B pillars and windshield frame are UNBELIEVABLE. To drive a small car with the rock-solid feel of a full-sized Lincoln sedan is a surreal experience. Even at 108,000 miles there isn't a squeak, vibration or rattle to be heard. This is a testament to the kind of Italian workmanship Intermecannica put into all their cars, but that the other aftermarket convertibles failed to consider.


    I'm sorry you lost track of that car in the Highland, CA wrecking yard. But years ago many '60 Edsel convertibles were let go because they were rusty or simply missing too many parts. At the same time, we must always remember that were it not for attrition, most of our collector cars would still be common used cars!
    Last edited by 1982cabrio; 08-08-2010 at 08:06 PM.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1982cabrio View Post
    Gentlemen, may I jumpstart this excellent dialog from 4 years ago?


    True, the aftermarket convertibles were unattractive jokes after Ford announced they were resuming convertible production for 1983. But given the quality of most of them - and given the quality of Ford's then-recent offerings with flimsy bodies, plastic interiors, etc. - Ford didn't need the added insult of being maligned with the cheesy quality of these aftermarket convertibles, while trying to persuade America that "At Ford Quality Is Job #1". But if you look back in history, custom coachbuilding always takes a generation or three to become fully appreciated. And in that sense I'm satisfied these aftermarkets - even the crummier ones that did little but remove the sedan roof and snap a crude fabric top onto the body - will come into their own as another form of American automotive ingenuity.

    Last year I bought a 1982 Intermeccanica C'abrio. Last Friday I replaced the brakes and transmission and finally drove it for the first time. WOW! The body integrity which IM added into this car's floors, A and B pillars and windshield frame are UNBELIEVABLE. To drive a small car with the rock-solid feel of a full-sized Lincoln sedan is a surreal experience. Even at 108,000 miles there isn't a squeak, vibration or rattle to be heard. This is a testament to the kind of Italian workmanship Intermecannica put into all their cars, but that the other aftermarket convertibles failed to consider.
    Nice remarks. It is true that many of these coachbuilt convertibles were poorly built, but many others were engineering genius. Many were built to a higher standard than the +83 "factory" Mustang convertibles (remember that they were also built as hardtops and sent to a special facility (Cars + Concepts) to have the roof removed and the reinforcing done).

    I have heard owners of coachbuilt convertibles say that the convertibles sometimes had less flex than the hardtops! It was possible. If it was well built and properly engineered…it was possible.

    I agree that the value of these is still sadly too low and I also think they will increase in value more than the factory ’83 convertibles. Especially the better built ones with nice touches like a hard tonneau cover or a 2-seat configuration. I am starting to see this with the AutoForm built roadster ’82-86 Camaros and Firebirds. Also, some of the premium coachbuilt convertibles like the Lincoln Mark IV and Sevilles are starting to see collector car appreciation. I think the better built Mustang convertibles are next. The Intermeccinica and Tomaso Swift convertibles will lead the pack.

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