Close



Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1

    Default Removing a header/collector stud - tips?




    I received some FMS headers in pretty nice shape, but the problem is there's this collector bolt that is absolutely petrified.

    I've tried soaking it down in penetrating oil and using vice grips, but she won't budge. It looks like there's a chunk missing from somebody trying to twist it out before too as you can see in the photo. Not only that, but the threads on the short end are buggered up as well....so even if I were to get it to break, twisting it through might damage the rest.

    So what do I do here? Was this a waste?
    1986 Mustang GT - 2A, 5 Sp
    2018 Subaru WRX (Daily)

  2. #2
    FEP Supporter
    qikgts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Rockledge, FL
    Posts
    1,483

    Default

    Not a waste at all. Fix it with fire. Go get a MAP gas torch at Lowes or Home Depot.

    Or go cold... Freeze Off... https://www.crcindustries.com/freeze...nt-11-5-wt-oz/

    You can always resort to brute force and cut it short then drill a hole in the stud and break it apart from the inside.
    '85 GT

  3. #3

    Default

    Personally i would cut that off, drill it out, and install a new stud.
    79 Zephyr, 4.6L 4v/4r70w swap, with team z front and rear suspension, 8.8 and upgraded brakes and coil overs. Running Holley Terminator X Max.

  4. #4

    Default

    You have access to a welder?

    I had some broken/rusted studs on a set of 5.0 headers I'm going to use on the LTS.

    I welded an old jug nut onto them and was able to get them out without too much excessive fuss. The heat from the welding helps break things up and the larger nut gives you something substantial to get a wrench on.




    Then I just installed some new studs.
    83 TC "Clone"
    85 Marquis LTS
    86 LTD Wagon

  5. #5

    Default

    I don't have a welder. Maybe I'll pick up a little blowtorch and heat it up to smithereens and give it another go. If that doesn't work I'll just drop it off to a shop and have them do it, and maybe chase the threads. Luckily this is a want, not a need, and I can take my time with the solution.

    At this point, it makes me think.....Should I be worried at all about removing the bolts that connect the factory headers? They look like they've been baked on there pretty good for the last 38 years, and I'd sure hate to break one. Are these troublesome or fairly safe?
    1986 Mustang GT - 2A, 5 Sp
    2018 Subaru WRX (Daily)

  6. #6

    Default

    Might want to use a MAP (not propane) torch on them also...

    Or a handheld induction heater would do the same thing (and without the worry/concerns of an open flame).
    1985 Mustang GT (Mothballed...Desired restomod parts acquired...Top of my project list for my 2024 retirement!)

  7. #7
    FEP Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    731

    Default

    I have always had excellent luck using a lot of heat from a propane or map gas torch and vice grips. Heat the manifold (or header) and then spray the stud to quickly cool it down). Sometimes you have to heat it up and spray it down several times. The actual spray penetrant doesn't make that much difference since most of it gets burned up when you spray it on the hot stud. I extracted many a crusty stud from old SBC ram's horn manifolds that were much older and much crustier than what you are working with using that method. I'd be willing to bet the threads in the collector are still in good shape. No better feeling than when the stud starts to turn its way out.
    '89 XR-7 5 Speed
    '95 SC 5 Speed
    '91 Crown Vic P72 351W
    '97 Thunderbird
    '85 Ford LTD Squire

  8. #8
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    5,167

    Default

    Agreed getting a stub out like that is worth attempting and is gratifying when it comes out.
    Mind over matter.

    Retrofitted a Ranger 2.3 factory tube ss header on the 79's 2.3 engine. Very similar design.
    Instead of studs, ran flange type bolts and nuts thru the collector flange holes. Easier to replace later.
    Can't remember if i used one size smaller to avoid drilling out the holes after the studs came out.
    Socket or wrench clearance is the same.
    Heat, penetrating oil soak, repeat. Let sit for a day or at least a few minutes for oil to do its thing.
    Vice grip would be first pick to turn stud out.
    When possible, an impact tool works good helps break loose any rust.
    Muffler shops do studs every day. Off the car, would take a few minutes and a couple bucks.

    Not so much on bolts in block; afraid an impact's torque would snap bolt but they are pretty tough.
    Did not have any problem taking the cast iron manifold bolts out with a socket wrench.
    Have clear access for engine in car bolt removal more than a V6 or V8.
    Reused them after cleaning with wire wheel.
    Last edited by gr79; 02-24-2024 at 04:06 PM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gr79 View Post
    Muffler shops do studs every day. Off the car, would take a few minutes and a couple bucks.
    I'm thinking along these lines. I bought a propane torch, but I'm in no rush to get these on the car or dink around with fossilized bolts.

    In all likeliness, I'll probably bring these with my new hardware and gaskets to my buddies shop and just have him do the rest. They still need to adjust my exhaust just a hair since they did the H pipe last fall - One of the tail pipes is just a hair shorter on one side, and there's a slight rattle under certain RPM and it's driving me nuts. Figure they can kill two birds with one stone here in the spring instead of multiple trips.
    1986 Mustang GT - 2A, 5 Sp
    2018 Subaru WRX (Daily)

  10. #10

    Default

    Ok so I changed my mind and gave the blowtorch method a try since I was bored this afternoon.

    Holy smokes.....You guys weren't kidding. That worked amazingly well and was ridiculously satisfying!

    Last edited by ITdude87; 02-25-2024 at 06:32 PM.
    1986 Mustang GT - 2A, 5 Sp
    2018 Subaru WRX (Daily)

  11. #11

    Default

    Nice job! Gotta love when something goes smoothly.
    Had ~
    '81 Mustang Ghia Hatchback, red, 4-cylinder, 5-speed, slow, but looked great!

    Have ~
    '83 Mustang GT Hatchback, white with black, stock 5.0, 5-speed, T-tops, dual exhaust

  12. #12
    FEP Power Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Muskegon (Power Tour stop!)MI
    Posts
    1,352

    Default

    Heck yeah, heat for the win.
    '86 GT - weekend driver
    '86 Capri 5.0
    '86 Turbo Coupe
    '17 Mustang GT
    '23 BRONCO

  13. #13
    FEP Supporter
    qikgts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Rockledge, FL
    Posts
    1,483

    Default

    There you go!
    '85 GT

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •