Close



Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    Default question; what size rear drums would a 1988 LX 50 convertible have?

    The Ford shop manual is suggesting there are two size drums, either a 9" or 10" version.
    The illustrations shown appears to match the 9" version, but I don't trust that 100% as both drawing are similar.

    It's all a bit rusty after sitting for a while outside, so I'm going to replace the inner springs and cables, new shoes, and new drums, but want to be sure I order the right parts. The last time I did this on the car was about 15 years ago and probably over 100K miles back.

    I plan to put the Hawk Carbotic brake pads on again from Maximum Motorsports. They work fantastic and still have some life left in them, but are a few extra $$ over standard driver brands. We all know the stock set up is weak on braking.

    Since the brake lines are rusted out and just started leaking...weak pedal, so I'll need to replace them as well, any suggestion for a source?

    Thanks for any help,
    Rich
    Last edited by richstang; 08-23-2020 at 05:12 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I used SSTubes.com for the rear hard lines on my SN95 upgrade last winter. Great prices, excellent product.

    Should be 9" rear drums. I've got a pair of em' off my car in great shape, pay for the ride and you can have them.
    Jeremiah

    1986 Mustang GT 5spd
    1998 Explorer Limited 5.0AWD (Wife's Ride)
    1999 Ranger Ex-Cab 3.0 5spd (My Winter Beater)

  3. #3

    Default

    I'll check out SSTubes, thanks!

    Thanks for the offer, if I pay for the ride. I'll give that some thought. I was thinking I should just get new ones as there's nothing visually wrong with what I have except age and tons of miles. Are your drums from the SN95? I'm guessing they are the same, but do you know that for certain?

  4. #4

    Default

    The drums are off my 86GT, the SN95 rear brakes are disc which required different hard lines to work with the swap.
    Jeremiah

    1986 Mustang GT 5spd
    1998 Explorer Limited 5.0AWD (Wife's Ride)
    1999 Ranger Ex-Cab 3.0 5spd (My Winter Beater)

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Two86fiveoh's View Post
    The drums are off my 86GT, the SN95 rear brakes are disc which required different hard lines to work with the swap.
    Yea, I should have known they were not from a 94-98 or 99-04. I have a '98 with rotors on the rear, but I've never replaced them.

  6. #6
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    4,368

    Default

    10's are for wagons, 4wd, hd apps.

    Same 9" ones on Mustang, Ranger, others.
    My Ranger brakes are better than the car's.
    Fronts and their matching parts are the diff. M/C, booster, rotors.

    I used AGS brake lines from AZ on the truck mains. Rear drums have one prebent ss and regular.
    Coated AGS bend real easy to match oem pattern or freelance.
    Mustang has AGS and prebent ss f-r main line from Inline Tube.
    Regular steel is ok looks stock, AGS easiest to work and not expensive, ss expensive, hard to work, look the best.
    Last edited by gr79; 08-23-2020 at 04:42 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks for the added notes - 10" for wagon or heavy duty

    I have to get under the car this weekend and see how bad the rust is on the rear connector hose lines, the intermediate hard lines, and front hard lines.
    For the rear set the difference in price on Stainless vs Steel was minimal, it probably will add up more on the others if needed.
    Because of vertigo issues working under the car, I will probably go with pre-bent.

  8. #8
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    4,368

    Default

    Classic Tube has them. NPD sells them. Prob others.

    Brakes are one area to spend a few xtra bucks on. Talking stock or better quality, not doing major upgrades.
    Practicing, learning, getting correct tools to work on and bleed brakes is invaluable.
    DIY saves big money easily hundreds in labor. Money saved for something else on the list.

    Also do not really like to work under car. Rust dust, pieces, lighting.

    I like to put a dab of anti seize on the ends of the brake line under the tube nut fittings. Can seal gap with butyl.
    Likely the tube fittings are rusted to the line when you have to remove one, say for a wheel cyl.
    Good places that prebend can also substitute ss fittings in place of regular, and add or have gravel guard spring sections.

    What was cool with the AGS type is can be easily bent almost exactly to match a factory one. Steel, SS not so much.
    Can tweak line into position quite a bit without messing up the bends made prior..
    Carefully removed the old one, trying not to bend it too far to remove it. Some were so rusty they broke in two.
    Then took it over to the bench and copied it. Wanted all line bends and lengths to fit like factory and did.

    SS helps in this area. Did the drivers side of the axle to wheel cyl lines on the Ranger in 2010.
    Cost was a lot, 40.00 for one short line. Forgot to do the ss fittings. So far so good. Have not had to remove it.

  9. #9

    Default

    Yes, I agree with much of what your suggesting. The anti seize dab is a good tip. I probably would not have thought about that, but it couldn't hurt. I've never used butyl before, so I'll have to take look at that.

    DIY & saving money. Most us need more of it so it works for me too. My repair list is just too long for this car. I'm not a mechanic, but know enough to get in trouble. I like knowing a job was done right as well.

    Did a quick look / test under the car before the rain came in this evening. The rear hard line is spraying fluid right over the differential, to the center flex hose line, might even be at the fitting. I guess to be safe I'll have to buy that part too. The intermediate lines don't look great, but they are dry so I'll leave them alone for now.

    Thanks again for the reply.
    Last edited by richstang; 08-27-2020 at 09:06 PM. Reason: correcting sentence grammar

  10. #10

    Default

    The SSTubes rear line pair came in yesterday. After soaking all the connection with WD40 yesterday, I started today on the left side today. First wanted to drain the fluid, but the bleeder snapped right off with little effort. UGH! I guess I'll have to replace the wheel cylinder too now.

    The two rear line fasteners on the rear of the axle came loose with no problem. I can't see how the right side line center bracket is held. It looks like a bolt over the top holds it, now sure why it was needed in the first place. I also picked up a new center hose line, just in case.

    I hate rust, and these 30 year old + car have it everywhere here in the northeast. Time to get back to it and see what else inevitably will go wrong.

  11. #11

    Default

    Both lines were a perfect fit from SSTubes. I followed the advice here and put some anti-seize lube on them (Thanks)

    At first they leaked, but only because I didn't want to over tighten them. After fixing that, all is well
    I did replace both wheel cylinders as the bleeder valve broke on one side. Also put it new hardware that was very rusty.
    The was still lots of life left in the shoes so they went back on as is.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •