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  1. #1

    Default Best option for cut radio opening? (84 GT)

    Hey fellas. I've poked around in here and haven't really found a clear solution on how to fit my stock radio back into my butchered up dash opening. I was lucky enough to get one of the many of these cars that some genius decided to hack the radio opening and attempt to dye a red interior black. I'm reversing everything back to stock the best I can.

    This is an '84 GT and the radio I was able to source looks like either an '85 or '86. The brackets on it are for a truck application, so disregard that (they simply unscrew from the radio chassis). I'm debating on either totally opening up the opening as neatly as possible to allow the use of this radio, or if any of you have some good suggestions, I can possibly source an '84 or earlier radio that uses the separate face plate. I've also seen the radio delete plate that LMR re-pops that could possibly be used as a trim panel. It would probably have to be held on with double-sided tape as the mounting areas are all gone now except for the notches on the top.

    Pics below:

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    Name:  opening.jpg
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    There's not much material left around the opening at this point, so I'm leaning towards just carefully trimming the hole out to accommodate the later radio. My only issue with this approach is finding the 85-86 brackets and drilling holes for the screws in the upper contour of the radio opening. Is that possible on these earlier dashes? I know the later dashes had a recessed area for the screw to reinforce that area from cracking. What say y'all? Anybody done this on their 4-eye? Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by graphicdesigner80; 10-30-2019 at 12:53 PM.
    '84.5 GT vert / roller 5 liter 4v / t5
    '86 LX coupe / 331 / t5
    '86 F-150 - 5 liter / efi / aod
    '56 F-100 - 272 y-block / 3 on the tree

  2. #2

    Default

    Yes, I did this.
    See how at the link.
    http://myzephyrs.com/din_to_shaft.htm
    Lots of FREE F/Z info on my site.
    http://myzephyrs.com

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RED 78' View Post
    Yes, I did this.
    See how at the link.
    http://myzephyrs.com/din_to_shaft.htm
    Thanks, Red78! Very helpful. Looks like that would work best with the '84 & older style. Might have to play around and see if I can make this one work with your method. Measurements are extremely helpful. Thanks again!

  4. #4
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
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    Default

    Have early 90's Ford electronic DIN radios in my car for a while now. No more fighting with old shaft radios.
    I cut out the dash similar. Saved the cut pieces. Absolutely no regrets.
    In the case of the truck radio, brackets, dash: would cut the brackets off the radio for clearance.
    If a mistake happens, easier to replace radios than repairing or replacing dash hulls.
    My radio just sits in there, a piece of wood wedged in from the back of dash to support it.
    The newer style radios are lighter, smaller, more reliable, easier to support saving the dash as much as possible.
    90's radio is different than a early radio in that is has side brackets. Snaps into dash. Remove with tool.
    No tool needed for removal on mine as the matching metal support frame in the dash is not there.
    It does snap in there somewhat. The radio face plate keeps the radio from sliding back into the dash.
    Dabs of good old dum dum butyl, on the back of faceplate, sticks it to the remaining plastic of dash cutout.
    This stopped the tendency of the radio to back out of the cutout over time.

    The newer style radios use different connectors, so i rewired everything to keep the oem radio connectors intact.
    Bought several different styles from the pic a part yards with the matching connectors, and as much wire as i could save for a pigtail.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gr79 View Post
    Have early 90's Ford electronic DIN radios in my car for a while now. No more fighting with old shaft radios.
    I cut out the dash similar. Saved the cut pieces. Absolutely no regrets.
    In the case of the truck radio, brackets, dash: would cut the brackets off the radio for clearance.
    If a mistake happens, easier to replace radios than repairing or replacing dash hulls.
    My radio just sits in there, a piece of wood wedged in from the back of dash to support it.
    The newer style radios are lighter, smaller, more reliable, easier to support saving the dash as much as possible.
    90's radio is different than a early radio in that is has side brackets. Snaps into dash. Remove with tool.
    No tool needed for removal on mine as the matching metal support frame in the dash is not there.
    It does snap in there somewhat. The radio face plate keeps the radio from sliding back into the dash.
    Dabs of good old dum dum butyl, on the back of faceplate, sticks it to the remaining plastic of dash cutout.
    This stopped the tendency of the radio to back out of the cutout over time.

    The newer style radios use different connectors, so i rewired everything to keep the oem radio connectors intact.
    Bought several different styles from the pic a part yards with the matching connectors, and as much wire as i could save for a pigtail.
    Thanks, gr79.

    I'd considered that option as well. I have a couple of digital am/fm cassette players from mid-90's mustangs laying around. After digging into the dash, i discovered that I still have all the factory wiring, amp, & amp pull all intact and functional.

    This being the case, I'd rather go with the shaft-style radio. Mainly for appearance sake. I know the radio isn't the correct one for the car, but it's similar and is a Ford unit. As long as I can listen to something, I don't care too much about quality and hi-tech features.
    '84.5 GT vert / roller 5 liter 4v / t5
    '86 LX coupe / 331 / t5
    '86 F-150 - 5 liter / efi / aod
    '56 F-100 - 272 y-block / 3 on the tree

  6. #6
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
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    How true.
    Went thru a few shaft ones and ran out of sources.
    Then went aftermarket. New black JVC shaft cassette radio was good. Analog dials are cool. Have them in home.
    Then a new Sony. Had too many little buttons. Removable silver face. Never got used to operating it nor did it work well.
    Finally went with used Fords with new aftermarket amps. Factory radios are simple to operate, have clear radios, and amp up well.
    Prefer the ones with the little knobs and digital tuning/clock readout over the no knob all button versions.
    Hate pushing buttons to scroll even one level of 'menu'. Knobs are faster for everything except maybe station hopping.
    Can adjust by ear. A quick look to see which knob to grab.
    Electronic has to be viewed first to quickly select correct menu. And then they disappear after a few seconds. Distracting.
    Last edited by gr79; 10-29-2019 at 09:01 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gr79 View Post
    How true.
    Went thru a few shaft ones and ran out of sources.
    Then went aftermarket. New black JVC shaft cassette radio was good. Analog dials are cool. Have them in home.
    Then a new Sony. Had too many little buttons. Removable silver face. Never got used to operating it nor did it work well.
    Finally went with used Fords with new aftermarket amps. Factory radios are simple to operate, have clear radios, and amp up well.
    Prefer the ones with the little knobs and digital tuning/clock readout over the no knob all button versions.
    Hate pushing buttons to scroll even one level of 'menu'. Knobs are faster for everything except maybe station hopping.
    Can adjust by ear. A quick look to see which knob to grab.
    Electronic has to be viewed first to quickly select correct menu. And then they disappear after a few seconds. Distracting.
    Absolutely agree. I have a Kenwood head unit in my '86, and forget all the functions since i don't drive it very often. Lately, i just put it on one station and leave it.

    It's nice to have a simple, clearly labeled radio that doesn't require scrolling through menus since the battery was disconnected and everything went back to factory default.

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