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Thread: Finally ....

  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by martin0660 View Post
    I did not find just a block. Had some full tall deck stuff offered but mostly well beyond my budget.

    Just filled a good core block, even if I find an aftermarket block, I want to move my rotator to a new block as a spare at least. Lots of value in the rotator anyway.

    Regarding .030 ... yes/no/sort of, lol ... these blocks suffer from thin cylinders in the front of #4 and the rear of #1. Plenty strong on the thrust, but thin in those spots in particular. Some data, we sonic checked the block I’m building on now and it’s much thicker. We broke a piece out of my old block where it spilt and it was only .095 thick ... figure -.015 for .030 over so it was only .125 thick there to start ... new block will be at least that thick even with .030 over.

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/xkydPQ3HMhSMEuwM8

    Keep in mind, although those numbers seem scary, that block went more than 120 passes north of 500 rwhp over 2 seasons before it split. Not a perfect situation, but the different between .020 over or .030 isn’t enough to make a difference and the “good rings” are only available like that.
    Great stuff! I have a line on a complete 2.3t. Now whether it goes in my 85 or I trade that off for another Fox roller is yet to be seen.
    1985 GT, Sunroof, 5 Lug, Rear Discs, 01 Graphite Bullets, 88 forged piston shortblock, 2.02/1.60 Alum heads, Weiand Stealth, Holley C950 TBI, BBK Long tubes

  2. #52
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
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    All Fords Michigan plant engines except the 240/300 in lines and the 370/429/460 and last 78 onwards 351M's were 130 thou thick at the thrust face according to Al Turner and Brad Girdwood. That can drop to 90 thou in service if there is core shift and a 30 thou ovebore. For all other surfaces except the deck and bulkheads and caps, the target thickness was 187 thou according to Ak Miller.

    Compared to brand C's and pre 1969 Michigan Fords, the average wall thickness was about 243 to 245 thou in head and block castings that used the small block style "thin-wall" green sand process. Lima 2300's were made with less iron thickness than Pinto 2000's, and Ford Dearborn repitched the bore centers to almost the same average pitch as the B series Volvo fours. Even at 4.173 inches, there isn't s heck of a lot of room for a full jacket when a 3.78" bore engine has just 390 thou between each cylinder wall. Its very much like the 351 Cleveland...cardboard or MDF thin unless you get an aftermarket siamese block. The rule is 180 thou at the trust faces for just a 80 hp per cylinder NASCAR block.

    A turbo 2.3 Lima probably needs a down grade to a 2000 Ranger block to get some extra wall thickness. Ford have some great forged pistons for the twin cam turbo Sierra and Escort RS 2000 Turbo Cosworth, and the RS 200 T four wheel drives. They allow you to upgrade to a 0.945 wrist pin which allows your good rods to be used.

    If you sleeve down to 3.575 to say 3.635" and add a 3.401 2.5 small jounal crank you might be able to run a clearanced bore for valves, and use the stock Ford block.

    Do you wanna do a Bore sleeve to get a decent wall thickness without extra expense on the block?

    Adding a 2.5 crank to get the capacity back?

  3. #53

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    The Thrust side of a Lima block is plenty strong.

    The 2.0 used in the Euro cars is a different platform than the 2.0 Ranger blocks. The Ranger blocks are no better than the 2.3 turbo stuff.

    Sleeves are a terrible thing at my power level. The blocks move around a lot and keeping a sleeve in place is horrific.

    The 2.5 stuff isn't the end all either. The problem is they are small journal only and you either need to run bearing spacers of convert to the small journal blocks. When you do that, you end up with half a thrust bearing. Ok for daily use, a little troubling at this power level.

    Until we can get Esslinger to make another run of the HD blocks, it's just a matter of picking the best production blocks you can find and going forward.
    Bob Myers

    84 Capri RS Turbo - Only a 4 banger - 1/8th 6.29@110, 1/4 9.87@137

  4. #54
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
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    Aint that the truth...

    I learned that sleeving only work well if you are creating wall thickness. The diesel guys I worked with said that a top plate is the best retention. A few if those old Georgia State guys did the tall deck 460 Lima strokers with a one inch plate and sleeves for real big mountain motors.

    My last 2.3 turbo was an IHI'd propane Cortina V6 with a variant of the old 2600 Cologne Capri engine in it. Its 3.545 " bore and massive 4.76 inch bore centers protected it from many problems.

    My worst experience has been seeing an old hard filled in line 250 turbo with sleeves being ruined by hairline cracks between the cylinder walls because the sleeves were too thick.They say Post Trumatic Stress Disorder can only happen to those who have served in combat. After seeing that destroyed block, I'd add deck and top plate any sleeved block. You can lock them in, the diesel guys have been doing it for years.

    Ford has a habit of downgrading main journals on some of its stroker engines.

    Glad youve gone through the proper process BM.


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