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Thread: Removing EFI

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by wraithracing View Post
    Since no one really answered your first question I will try and help a bit.

    Remove the upper intake manifold first. To do that you will need to remove the 5.0/EFI plate on the top of the intake manifold runners. There should be 4 screws that hold that down. Most likely they are Torx heads, so be aware. Once that is removed you can get to the two long upper manifold bolts. I like to leave those for last after removing the rest of the bolts that hold the upper to the lower intake. If the manifold has never been removed there will also be a metal bracket on the back of the upper connecting it to the lower, essentially a support brace. Once you get the upper intake off you can decide if you want to remove the fuel injectors and fuel rails. If you do, there are two bolts on either side of the lower intake that hold the fuel rail to the intake. Remove those and then pull up on the fuel rail. Most likely some of the injectors will stay stuck in the intake and some will stay stuck in the rails. Remove the rest and that will give you clear access to the bolts that hold the lower intake in place. If you haven't already you will need to remove the distributor first. I recommend making sure you are on TDC for #1 cylinder and the timing mark is either at @ 10 degrees advance or 0 degrees TDC. FYI #1 cylinder is the first cylinder on the passenger side of the engine. You can pull the plug and rotate the engine over by hand and feel the compression to help verify TDC. I would also not what direction the rotor inside the cap is pointing that will help when you install the new distributor.

    At this point you should have the intake manifold removed. If you plan on installing an earlier timing cover for the fuel pump, then you will need to remove the accessories. Otherwise you can leave them in place as is if running an electric fuel pump. Hopefully that helps with the disassembly. Good Luck!
    That's perfect, thanks Trey!

  2. #27

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    One tip I can share ...... Your engine crankshaft goes around twice for every one revolution of the camshaft and therefore the distributor. Your crank goes 720 degrees for every 360s movement of the distributor rotor therefore.

    On a V8 another spark even happens very 90 degrees of engine rotation.

    Before the combustion event in each cylinder the intake valve was open and air/fuel came into the cylinder as the piston went down then the valve closed as it came back up. The pistons come up compressing air/fuel. At top dead center on the compression stroke (or around 10 degrees before if the timing is set to factory spec) the spark plug fires lighting off the mixture.

    The spark event for #1 happens when the rotor is pointed to the rear or the engine. If you put the first four numbers of the firing order on any V8 engine over the last four you now know what cylinder fires when the rotor is 180 degree around.

    On a Ford it just so happens that when your engine is 1/2 way through the firing order the metal contact on the rotor will tend to point directly to the front of the engine.

    Timing is set by moving the distributor cap relative to the rotor. So you could, in theory put the distributor in lots of different ways and set it so the cap is correct relative to the installation. Nothing will care but factor put it in with the rotor pointed directly back and sometimes things won't clear the advance or the ignition module if its not done that way.

    Once its put where it is supposed to be where the rotor is relative to the pistons never changes unless something is badly broken.

    Knowing that there are two TDC events and where they happen relative to the rotor is helpful. Technically you can figure out where to put the distributor every 90 degrees of rotation just by following the firing order too, but lets not get too crazy.

    I've done it plenty of times with #1 on TDC on exhaust and the rotor pointed to the front.

    anyway -- it just saves a little time knowing how this stuff works.

    With this knowledge, 99.9% of the time you should be able to take a new distributor out of the box, stab it where it needs to be knowing where the old one was or where you left the engine when you assembled it, throw the cap on, hook the plug wires up, and fire it first try.

    I haven't stabbed a distributor "180 degrees out" on a Ford in a long time.... works for me.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by erratic50 View Post
    One tip I can share ...... Your engine crankshaft goes around twice for every one revolution of the camshaft and therefore the distributor. Your crank goes 720 degrees for every 360s movement of the distributor rotor therefore.

    On a V8 another spark even happens very 90 degrees of engine rotation.

    Before the combustion event in each cylinder the intake valve was open and air/fuel came into the cylinder as the piston went down then the valve closed as it came back up. The pistons come up compressing air/fuel. At top dead center on the compression stroke (or around 10 degrees before if the timing is set to factory spec) the spark plug fires lighting off the mixture.

    The spark event for #1 happens when the rotor is pointed to the rear or the engine. If you put the first four numbers of the firing order on any V8 engine over the last four you now know what cylinder fires when the rotor is 180 degree around.

    On a Ford it just so happens that when your engine is 1/2 way through the firing order the metal contact on the rotor will tend to point directly to the front of the engine.

    Timing is set by moving the distributor cap relative to the rotor. So you could, in theory put the distributor in lots of different ways and set it so the cap is correct relative to the installation. Nothing will care but factor put it in with the rotor pointed directly back and sometimes things won't clear the advance or the ignition module if its not done that way.

    Once its put where it is supposed to be where the rotor is relative to the pistons never changes unless something is badly broken.

    Knowing that there are two TDC events and where they happen relative to the rotor is helpful. Technically you can figure out where to put the distributor every 90 degrees of rotation just by following the firing order too, but lets not get too crazy.

    I've done it plenty of times with #1 on TDC on exhaust and the rotor pointed to the front.

    anyway -- it just saves a little time knowing how this stuff works.

    With this knowledge, 99.9% of the time you should be able to take a new distributor out of the box, stab it where it needs to be knowing where the old one was or where you left the engine when you assembled it, throw the cap on, hook the plug wires up, and fire it first try.

    I haven't stabbed a distributor "180 degrees out" on a Ford in a long time.... works for me.
    Thanks erratic

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