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  1. #1

    Default Thorough investigation/mapping of Holley 4180's...

    This will be ongoing, as I discover and reveal all of the inner workings of these... as well as what is totally jacked up about them in my opinion, inconsistent, unnecessary in my opinion, modifiable to be much better functioning in my opinion, etc... and thorough means completely opening things up, pulling back all the veils of previously secret/hidden calibration details and the sizes of everything, and what all those sizes of everything means, what can and should be changed, or not changed, what was previously thought not possible to do or revert back to traditional modular Holley function, parts-wise, but is/are entirely possible with some simple, minor modifications, etc.

    The patient currently on deck is an original 1985 Mustang Holley/Motorcraft four barrel that I own, that I acquired on part trade for '72 R-code ( 4-speed, 3.91 rear gears ) maCh1 Mustang 351C HO's Motorcraft 4300C (previously also thought too troublesome and not worth bothering with, and runs like a champion now) carburetor and distributor work, that has a busted base plate, but most all else is there and fully examine-able...









    Some of the calibration restrictions and bleeds, and where they are located:

    IFR's (idle feed restrictions)...




    The following are actually up-channel restrictions, since idle/transition air:fuel travels up these idle wells at this point within the metering block...




    The following are final restrictions (at the bottom surface of the main body) to, the tailoring of exactly how much primary idle/transition air:fuel is allowed to be delivered to the primary transfer slots and the primary idle mixture screws... transfer slot restrictions in traditional Holley carburetors are not usually necessary to dial back transition fueling with stock or mild camshaft-ed engines... no worries, this is only one of a number of unnecessary calibration design aspects I have found within these carburetors original designed and meant for very stock/mild 302 engines...





    For now, in closing, I'll just show my findings so far, and expand upon and discuss further later...






    Any questions, comments, additions, please fire away...

    Mike
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  2. #2
    FEP Member brianj's Avatar
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    Watching with interest. I have a 4150 i have yet to get brave enough to molest.
    1983 Mustang G.T. No-option stripper- I like strippers.
    5.0, GT40P heads, Comp Cams XE270HR-12 on 1.6 rockers, TFI spring kit, Weiand 174 blower, Holley 750 mechanical secondarys, Mishimoto radiator, Edelbrock street performer mechanical pump, BBK shortys, T-5 conversion, 8.8 rear, 3.73 gears, carbon fiber clutches, SS Machine lowers, Maximum Motorsport XL subframes, "B" springs.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianj View Post
    Watching with interest. I have a 4150 i have yet to get brave enough to molest.
    Hey Brian, thanks. I recently finished sorting out, re-calibrating (based on a fellow's mild 351W), and rebuilding a LIST-4779-2 750 double pumper. Here are some modification detail pictures and what all I put into it based on the engine combination, that should work very well... the bravery to "molest" and dial these suckers in really is worth it and rewarding with how surprisingly well they'll work, both for rock'n'roll power production and better fuel efficiency than imagined possible.


    Primary metering block idle feed restrictions drilled out and tapped for adjustable 6-32 brass set screws drilled for feed restriction size, and primary power valve channel restrictions drilled and tapped for adjustable 8-32 brass set screws drilled for feed restriction size ...




    Primary idle air bleeds drilled and tapped for adjustable 8-32 brass set screws drilled for bleed restriction size ...




    Primary idle feed and power valve channel restrictions in place...




    New cup plugs up top after all mods of block and wells cleared of any potential debris or drilling nicks into wells...




    New sized and adjustable primary idle air bleeds in place...




    ... and it's good baseline calibration (better suited than factory Holley calibration, for a stock/mild street engine/vehicle) for starters...



    .
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  4. #4

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    Awesome info as always!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by erratic50 View Post
    Awesome info as always!
    Thank you, Sir!
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  6. #6

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    Back to dissecting this '85 Mustang 4180 Holley 4-barrel carburetor...


    Primary main air bleeds, and four primary idle air bleeds and their passages' details within the main body (top is viewing from above, bottom is viewing from the front):



    * PLEASE DISREGARD these words and see same but corrected image below *... those cast right angle, horizontal air bleed passages... where I guess only the good lawd knows why in the world they would do that, and not simply drill angled connecting passages between the front face and the passage below the bleed (which is exactly what I'll be eventually doing)... let alone why move the inner air bleed over where it is instead of where they always were and still are... I have no clue... don't get me started now, lol... much more detail later... though right now, I am unable to see light shone into one, out the other, or vice versa, so there is obviously enough crap or something blocking the un-see-able, un-check-able, un-easily-clean-able cast horizontal passage that's at a depth about the distance the bleeds are at... The purple dashed lines represent the passages that go right to the basement, to the primary transfer slots and primary idle mixture screw passages... again, much more juicy detail and modifications later...


    The top of the primary metering block, it's wells and some of the components described that hide inside them (ps... 5/16" cup plugs removed from main wells here up top, and approximately 1/8" lead balls removed from the other two (air wells and idle wells)):





    Some/most of the (unnecessary, numerous, and buried real good) primary metering block components and features detailed:




    Hopefully all this so far has been a good beginning to folks getting to know the insides of the 4180 Holley.

    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 03-26-2018 at 05:19 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  7. #7
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Default

    Wow that is fantastic work! How wonderfully detailed. Having the numbers are great also. I've been trying to find a definitive answer for the main "jet" size on that secondary metering plate. Finally have it thanks to you!

    One thing I did note, is that you wrote the pump cam is white. Stock I believe was pink position #1. All of my 4180c carbs came with that.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  8. #8

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    I lied, lol... Closer, more thorough examination reveals two horizontal drilled connecting passages, making the connection between the inner idle air bleeds and the (purple) idle wells in the main body, presently still plugged, from either side of the main body, inline with those larger inner idle air bleeds down in the choke shroud... one from a boss on it's own on the driver's side, and the other hidden down inside the hole of the front-most tapped screw boss for the choke... represented in the following corrected image by the red dashed lines...




    Though awfully sneaky, that makes better sense than my previous assumption, and that there was debris blocking things... live'n'learn, learn something new each day, lol
    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 03-26-2018 at 05:22 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by 85stanggt View Post
    Wow that is fantastic work! How wonderfully detailed. Having the numbers are great also. I've been trying to find a definitive answer for the main "jet" size on that secondary metering plate. Finally have it thanks to you!

    One thing I did note, is that you wrote the pump cam is white. Stock I believe was pink position #1. All of my 4180c carbs came with that.
    Thanks very much! I defaulted to leaving 'white' in the pump cam cell because there was no pump cam on this one when I got it, lol. Yes, I believe you're right they came with pinks, thank you.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  10. #10

    Default

    Watching this with a great deal of interest... Thank you, Walking Tall, for undertaking this project!
    Jim DeAngelis
    Cornucopia of Useless Knowledge
    Connoisseur of Dearborn Ferrous Oxide
    '83 GT hatch, currently under the knife

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by FB71 View Post
    Watching this with a great deal of interest... Thank you, Walking Tall, for undertaking this project!
    I'm glad you are. Thank you very much for joining in!
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  12. #12

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    Continuing on from post #8, where I discovered and showed the elusive but found horizontal passages that connect the inner primary idle air bleeds inside the choke shroud with the idle well that's within the main body, that leads straight down to the primary transfer slots and primary idle mixture screws... and here is where the drilled passages are externally found, and plugged with lead balls after they were drilled to make the connections between the bleeds' vertical passages and the vertical primary idle wells in the main body...





    THAT's where they hid 'em, lol ... I think it's also important to know things like this so that ALL internal passages can be opened up and seen and properly cleaned and blown out at rebuild or refresh time... as well as do better than lead balls to close things back up, with tapping (probably 8-32) thread into the passages and installing brass set screws.
    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 03-26-2018 at 10:53 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  13. #13

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    Had a few minutes to spare (don't seem to get many of those lately, lol) and opened up the horizontal connecting passages for the large (inside the choke shroud) primary idle air bleed's pathway to the primary idle circuit...





    ... so that mystery is solved for now...


    It gets better. I went to remove (drill out) the idle/transition restrictions from the bottom of the main body... and low and behold, well, one sec... here's the one that didn't get completely destroyed coming out...





    ... ... fuel pickup type tubes, but also "emulsion" tubes with the small side holes, upside-down, at the bottom of the main body's primary idle wells... umm... far too entirely out of place and convoluted logic to bother trying to wrap my head around, or for further comment, besides, needless to say, those, or replacements like it, will not be going back in. Restrictions (for the ability to restrict primary transition if the need ever arises, like for a super lumpy camshaft, using far more fuel off idle and at cruise than at idle) the size of 100% of the primary transfer slot's area will be created and going in.


    So now the primary idle wells are all opened up and clear...




    Frankly, I'm surprised however well anybody thought these things ran back in the day even, did think so... or maybe they didn't, I dunno... because primary idle and transition looks to be quite lean to me (and now I see the real reason for annular boosters and primary main air bleeds that would normally be too big, to fire them up sooner, richer, as well as lean out at higher airflow, etc), and maybe not so much idle, being adjustable with the mixture screws, but transition would have no choice but to be lean and/or erratic, AFR-wise, given what I just found in addition to the other circuit calibration orifices as well as their locations... etc, etc, etc...

    To be continued...
    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 03-27-2018 at 03:22 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  14. #14
    FEP Senior Member qikgts's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Walking-Tall View Post

    It gets better. I went to remove (drill out) the idle/transition restrictions from the bottom of the main body... and low and behold, well, one sec... here's the one that didn't get completely destroyed coming out...





    ... ... fuel pickup type tubes, but also "emulsion" tubes with the small side holes, upside-down, at the bottom of the main body's primary idle wells... umm... far too entirely out of place and convoluted logic to bother trying to wrap my head around, or for further comment, besides, needless to say, those, or replacements like it, will not be going back in.
    I wonder if Tuner could explain the thought process there?
    '85 GT

    The other one... 2016 F-150 XLT Supercab Ecoboosted with 3.73's...

  15. #15
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Walking-Tall View Post
    I lied, lol... Closer, more thorough examination reveals two horizontal drilled connecting passages, making the connection between the inner idle air bleeds and the (purple) idle wells in the main body, presently still plugged, from either side of the main body, inline with those larger inner idle air bleeds down in the choke shroud... one from a boss on it's own on the driver's side, and the other hidden down inside the hole of the front-most tapped screw boss for the choke... represented in the following corrected image by the red dashed lines...




    Though awfully sneaky, that makes better sense than my previous assumption, and that there was debris blocking things... live'n'learn, learn something new each day, lol

    this

    Quote Originally Posted by Walking-Tall View Post
    Thanks.

    Here's a good descriptive image of the different modular tried and true old school Holley passages and orifices and their functions:

    http://s1.bild.me/bilder/260513/537251761klx5s.jpg .......
    Holley changed the basic 4150/4160 stuff to the new 4180c/4190 protocol. Major changes




    Well tube calibration is based on the"working" gasoline level.

    Its analogous with the
    The phreatic zone, or zone of saturation, is the area below the water table, in which relatively all pores and fractures are saturated with water
    There is a zone of frothed gas above the 100% saturated zone. Air bleed holes in the well tube (aka, emulsion tubes) are added to trim or fatten fuel delivery at various fuel depths or stages. Ford conrolled four corner idle fuel stage by the bowel vent (BV) and the evaporative emissions equipment. And wide open throttle fuel stage by the conventional well tube postions.

    David Vizard decribes the upside doen fuel tim control.


    Its the same process as Webers or the old Edlebrock power plate system of well tube calibration.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pkFSA_rRFI

  16. #16

    Default

    I listened to that video twice to be certain of what I heard. Vizard is talking about examining "emulsion" tubes upside-down to understand them, not that they are in service upside-down, and also, he's not talking about "emulsion" tubes in service in any idle circuit, but the main circuit.

    As briefly as I can, here's my "take" on these things, and on the century+ old fully researched and established carved in stone rules and aspects of efficient and powerful administering of consistent, stable air:fuel to the internal combustion engine, implemented into the design and functioning very well about a half century ago now within the modular Holley carburetors, as well as no doubt others...:

    These... Ford things, in service, upside-down, at the final bit of an idle well ((with what (ideally) is an efficiently lean (interpreted very briefly later within internal combustion of 13+:1) air:fuel idle mixture, constantly being evacuated by the running idling engine)), before hitting the base plate, with it's transfer slot and curb idle discharge with mixture screw, hasn't much to do at all with the liquid fuel level in the float bowl, or the liquid fuel level and air:fuel mixture within the main circuit's well, besides the float level being correct in the bowl and in the main well so that the idle circuit can pull from the main well what is needed,... which is where correct air correction is done, in the main circuit well, otherwise known incorrectly for modular Holley and clone type carburetors as "emulsion" or "the emulsion package", either with similar tubes within the main wells, or with correctly located and sized air correction restrictions drilled from the air wells in a traditional Holley metering block, into the main wells, for air correction, the correcting of the natural tendency of a booster within a venturi, of increasing, basically exponentially, the air:fuel ratio delivered to a running engine sufficiently loaded and/or at WOT with increasing airflow past/thru the booster within the venturi. Variations of air:fuel ratio is not what we want with a sufficiently loaded and/or WOT internal combustion engine, and not some kind of "fuel curve" either, but as flat of the ideal (ie. 12.5:1) AFR for the engine in question across the widest rpm range from low to maximum rpm.

    The reasons I want to dive into making these carburetors less complicated and adjustable for best function, are not because I'm some kind of purist or something, but that I'd like to at least give these OE to the vehicle carburetors a fighting chance to work very well and be user friendly to those who choose to make performance modifications to their vehicle, and/or just as the necessary dialing in can be with a stock or mild vehicle, instead of them being shelved/tossed as they have been all these years and replaced with other things...

    Still, to be continued at a later time...
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by qikgts View Post
    I wonder if Tuner could explain the thought process there?
    Sorry I missed this earlier. There's one inquiring post regarding wanting to dig into a 4180 over at racingfuelsystems, in I think 2015, untouched to today. Pretty obvious, and I'm pretty sure that even anybody thoroughly "in the know", avoids these things like the plague... and from what I'm finding, for good reason. They are jacked up with a number of incredibly unnecessary "refinements" to the original very good functioning Holley 4150/4160 design. You're right though, if anybody could decipher or explain what the thinking might have been, or what the plain ole dumbassery of the situation is, it's tuner. What I will be reinstalling into the locations where these tubes came out, are two different sizes of transfer slot restrictions, because of the inconsistency of the primary transfer slot widths, and therefore a sizeable difference in the area of each primary transfer slot, so that at least what's available through each of the two primary throttle bore transfer slots for off-idle/cruise is equalized. Tuning, dialing in for differing vehicle combinations for best efficiency can then intelligently resume, like in any other non-jacked up Holley 4150/4160.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  18. #18

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    I misspoke above when stating, "What I will be reinstalling into the locations where these tubes came out, are two different sizes of transfer slot restrictions, because of the inconsistency of the primary transfer slot widths...", because the base plate for this one is broken. So, if and when I find a replacement base plate, I'll measure those primary transfer slots, and if by some miracle they are each the same width and length and therefore area, two 100% of transfer slot area restrictions will be installed where the tubes came out... and if the slots are unequal, different left and right size primary transfer slot restrictions will be installed to make what they are fed equal to the smaller of the two slots...




    ... the miles longer than necessary secondary transfer slots, the 2 submerged (unnecessary) and 2 high location idle feed restrictions in the secondary metering plate, and the secondary idle air bleeds that are too big, are other things we'll be getting into later...
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  19. #19

    Default

    Sorry to those following. Nothing to update yet. Still looking for a (n affordable) replacement base plate... to be continued...
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  20. #20

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    What baseplate exactly do you need? I have an '83 and '85 carb that I acquired to assemble one good one (never know what parts you'll need, right?). I'd be willing to part with one in exchange for some help building one. I'm an EFI guy with a rough knowledge of carbs. I'm great with electronics, but not experienced in the lost art of carb tuning...
    Jim DeAngelis
    Cornucopia of Useless Knowledge
    Connoisseur of Dearborn Ferrous Oxide
    '83 GT hatch, currently under the knife

  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by FB71 View Post
    What baseplate exactly do you need? I have an '83 and '85 carb that I acquired to assemble one good one (never know what parts you'll need, right?). I'd be willing to part with one in exchange for some help building one. I'm an EFI guy with a rough knowledge of carbs. I'm great with electronics, but not experienced in the lost art of carb tuning...
    Hi Jim,

    Either base would do... I assume they both have primary and secondary idle mixture screws? Sounds like a plan. I intend to continue to re-engineer back to good basic function and refurbish this one and then probably do something like raffle it off here for the four-eyed fans crowd that could use a good one, and then get reports back on how it's working and/or continuing to very finely tune it's function... which should be leaps and bounds better than the factory calibration and settings ever dreamed of. All of the posts above, as to building, are what I'm doing with this one... returning it back to sound function basics and very predictable (and fully tune-able) calibration, that will be far better with fuel efficiency, and therefore ANY "emissions" testing anywhere, as well as perfectly flat-lining from low speed to maximum rpm of the WOT air:fuel ratio. Let me know what you're looking for or to do with yours, or private message the details and we'll exchange addresses etc...

    Thanks very much for the offer,
    Mike
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  22. #22

    Default

    Sounds good. I'll PM you later with some pics and LIST numbers, and get a shipping address for you.
    Jim DeAngelis
    Cornucopia of Useless Knowledge
    Connoisseur of Dearborn Ferrous Oxide
    '83 GT hatch, currently under the knife

  23. #23

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    "The following errors occurred with your submission

    • FB71 has exceeded their stored private messages quota and cannot accept further messages until they clear some space."



    Clear out some of your Inbox, bud... lol....

    Thank you to Jim. The base plate we'll use to revive and enhance the function of this 4180 is on the way...
    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 05-26-2018 at 12:36 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

  24. #24

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    cleared. Slight delay shipping, but it will be on the way shortly.
    Jim DeAngelis
    Cornucopia of Useless Knowledge
    Connoisseur of Dearborn Ferrous Oxide
    '83 GT hatch, currently under the knife

  25. #25

    Default

    Did some drilling and tapping today...


    For if restrictions are necessary to equalize what goes to each left/right primary transfer slot and idle mixture screw, from sloppily machined unequal width/length primary transfer slots (as I have already seen with a few 4180 base plates...):



    External (to the choke shroud) primary idle air bleeds... that I deem unnecessary for the second or two or whatever while cranking and that the choke plate is shut. They'll be plugged with 8-32x3/16" brass socket set screws:



    For 8-32x3/16" brass socket set screws for closing back up instead of lead balls:



    For the changes to air bleed sizes I'll be installing:


    With the factory calibration that can be seen in a chart above, it's no coincidence that I had to clean noticeably more soot out of the secondary barrels than the primary barrels. These have an unbalanced calibration right from the get-go, which will have been to meet certain "emissions" regulations at certain modes of function, none of which had anything to do with efficiency, fuel efficiency or full power, then or now... it's meaningless today, and all of the added complication to simple efficient function is what I'm eliminating... speaking only of the main circuits right now, they're lean up front and compensate too rich out back... specifically, the unnecessarily big 0.077" secondary "jet" holes, and the unnecessarily small 0.022" secondary main air bleeds...


    As always, any questions or further or more detailed explanation about any of this, don't hesitate to chime in here.
    Last edited by Walking-Tall; 05-27-2018 at 10:38 PM.
    Mike
    1986 Mustang convertible 3.8L ---> BUILD THREAD
    1983 Mercury Cougar 3.8L LS
    1986 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L ELAN
    1966 Ford Fairlane sedan 200-6
    1966 Ford Fairlane GT (390ci 4spd)
    1981 Mercury Marquis Brougham
    1980 Capri RS Turbo
    1971 Mustang Fastback
    1974 Pontiac Luxury LeMans

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