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  1. #76
    FEP Senior Member Matt J's Avatar
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    Look at it this way, you're figuring out what it isn't...and you've found a lot of things that weren't right in the first place, so they all might have contributed at different times. If the gasket is good, and I'm no expert on this, but I assume if the gasket was in wrong or had another problem, wouldn't the car pretty consistently overheat? Seems like sometimes it's fine and others it's not. I'm not a mechanic and I don't want to give you bad advice on that, just seems like if it was bad or installed wrong it would always be overheating, not just sometimes. Of course, it started acting like this after you replaced the gaskets, which is kind of telling, but also there are a lot of other things that might have changed when you did that job. I hate to have you pull the top end off the engine for nothing. Also find it noteworthy that it overheats when going fast as opposed to in traffic. 75 probably doesn't run much over 2,000 RPMs, it's not like you're wide open there. Not sure what, if anything, that means, it's just strange. But it also might point to something other than the cooling system, for instance is there any way the timing can cause that only at higher speeds? Not sure there, someone with more knowledge than me will have to help you with that.

    Oh, and to answer your question about using a tee for the temp sender, i'd say no. If you have a mechanical gauge it uses a different plug. Just unplug the wire from the existing sender and tie it up to keep it off the exhaust, and hold on to the sender. Screw in the other one, and you're done. If you get to a point where you don't need the mechanical gauge anymore, just take it out, and put in the old sender and plug it back in. I didn't miss my old gauge once I had the other one in.

  2. #77

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    I didn't read the entire thread and this may have been covered. Anyway, is the clutch bad on your fan. I have seen them fail and cause symptoms similar to what you list. When the clutch fails the fan will work at idle and not at highway speed. It might be worth looking into if you haven't already.

  3. #78
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
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    If you wish to keep stock gauge and add mechanical gauge:
    Pic of tee added for mechanical gauge. Was easy to do once the parts were obtained.
    Added an adapter to move sensor out of coolant flow in hose. Both tees are Motorcraft KT-82.
    Simply doubled up factory sensor config in the heater hose.
    Name:  heater hose tees.jpg
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  4. #79

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    I bought a car someone just messed with. Had a bad exhaust leak and a cherry bomb welded straight to the cat. Car had a hole in the radiator a leaking water pump. All the hoses were new, but t it oept leaking water. It seemed to be resppy random. Sometimes I could drive it for a week straight and lose no coolant, other times it would leak like crazy.

    The more leaks I fixed, the worse it got. Finally, about ready to give up on the car, I had a buddy hold the car in gear and rev it while I was laying underneath it.

    It was puking coolant out of the side of the block straight onto the exhaust manifold. No leaks at idle or hot or when reving in neutral. Only under load.

    Pulled the whole engine apart. Found duct tape wrapped around stuff with a hose clamped over it, and a bunch of rtv on everything.

    Got the intake off, all the bolts were loose. Pulled the exhaust, and no exhaust manifold gasket.

    Jerk off that sold me the car took the engine apart, broke off a head bolt, then put everything back together with rtv and no gaskets.

    Pulled the head off where it was leaking, gasket looked brand new. Cleaned everything off and put it back together, plus one head bolt and actual gaskets. Never had a problem again.
    2 1986 cougars (both 4 eyed and 5.0)
    1 1987 cougar

  5. #80

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    Maintaining highway speed produces way more heat than just bopping around town so I can imagine that it really is a matter of heat accumulated. If the timing isn't advancing, maybe, that could do it but I am sure codes would be thrown. This thread is so long and I old I don't remember if you checked codes but I seem to remember you had. Hopefully you continue to do that as you fix stuff. I wish there was a clever way to detect the gasket issue without avtear down.
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  6. #81
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Not sure if I should just start a new thread at this point, but here's the history to the best of my recollection:

    - This is a 1985 GT 5.0 convertible, completely stock except for my Dynomax exhaust. It has the factory Holley 4180c carb on it. No codes to pull.
    - Between my dad and I, we've owned the car since new in 1985. So there's no funny business with botched work (unless I did it).

    - It's always been a FL car, but 2014-2017 I was living in CT for school with the Mustang in storage. It got driven occasionally when the weather was nice.
    - I could tell the intake gaskets were very slowly leaking in the back by the time we graduated residency in summer 2017, there was residue back there, but when warmed up, no leak.
    - We drove it from CT down to FL with my now wife back in July of 2017 when we relocated to FL -- not an issue with cooling or anything that entire 7 day trip (same as it has been since 1985)

    - I drove it to work occasionally that summer, but it started leaving a large puddle under the car from the intake gaskets
    - I stopped driving it, and started replacing the intake gaskets Oct 2017
    - I had the car apart for a while (new job, life is busy) and got the intake gaskets done a month later at the end of Nov '17
    - Decided to replace coolant, this is when the Freezetone/Prestone 50/50 mix went in.
    - Started car, set timing, adjusted carb, etc after having everything off for the intake gaskets - drove it around the block only and let it heat up to make sure things were good with the coolant level

    - Decided to replace the inlet heater hose, because when I took it off to remove the intake, it was pretty swollen.
    - Knew there was a high risk getting it off the heater core, but did it anyway and the core developed a big leak (ugh)
    - Replaced heater core (Motorcraft) and hose (Napa), and added restrictor bought from Ford and placed in heater inlet hose right after the intake ~Dec '17
    - Filled coolant back with recovered Freezetone/Prestone and checked for bleeding and warm up.
    - This is when the overflowing issues started
    - Decided to drive car to work one day now that it was "reliable" again, and halfway on my 15 minute drive, I see the temp climb way up the gauge. I limp the last few miles to work coasting and starting and coasting and starting
    - I can't remember if it overflowed when I got to work, but I went home to swap cars at lunch and it definitely overflowed and overheated (and that was just about 6 miles home)

    - That's when I started this thread Jan 2, 2018. In fact, my original post clears up some of the details to me now - it originally overflowed driving on the highway, which I probably didn't notice until driving to work the next day

    So since Jan '18 I have:

    - Replaced thermostat and housing (Ford Racing housing and Motorcraft t-stat)
    - Replaced radiator cap (carquest)
    - Placed spring in lower hose (NPD)
    - Had radiator "rodded" out (local shop here in Tampa)
    - Replaced radiator cap again (Stant)
    - Replaced water pump (Airtex AW4024)
    - Replaced fan clutch (Napa)

    Every time no matter what is replaced, the story is still the same. Fine around town, fine on the highway for a bit (then I see the needle sit a little higher after a while -- from the middle of "R" to between "R" and "M"), and then it overflows/boils over when I get off the highway.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  7. #82
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Ton of writing sorry. But here's what I did yesterday and gave up to let myself cool off

    I did test the BP of the two mixes: Freezetone/Prestone and Prestone/distilled. The Freezetone started getting some bubbles around 190*F, the distilled mix around 204*F. A rolling boil happened about 208-213*F with the Freezetone and 223*F with the distilled. The Freezetone did have times where it would flash over violently I noticed. Those BPs aren't THAT low, though. With a 16 psi cap, the BP should be high enough not to boil. Either way, I'm going to replaced everything with Prestone/Distilled.

    I got a mechanical temp gauge to put in, but I can't fit it because Ford stupidly made the hard steel fuel line run right over the temp sender outlet on the intake manifold. WTF Ford.

    I drained 2 gallons of Freezetone/Prestone mix out of the car facing down the incline of my driveway yesterday. The car holds 14 quarts. That means 6 quarts are still in the block.

    So I added a gallon of distilled, started briefly, and let it mix before draining again. (I'm trying to clear the block of the coolant mix by diluting it without using my hose because our water is so hard here, I don't want to introduce a ton of contaminants. Our drinking glasses get scale on them air drying.)

    Here's where it gets weird: I went through 3 cycles of adding a gallon or more, starting the car, turning around up the incline of my driveway to get air out, and then turning it around to drain as much out. I stopped after the third gallon, because I was stumped: the car heated up and t-stat started opening. The level in the radiator stayed the same (about halfway full until I drain it). Upper hose was getting hot, engine wasn't overheating. I turned it off though.

    BUT the radiator and upper hose was 166*F on the entire passenger half of the radiator top to bottom and only 77*F on the driver side of the radiator top to bottom. Perfectly split down the middle where the core support runs... What's up with that? I would expect that the hot fluid would at minimum mix with the cold fluid so that the entire bottom half of the radiator where the fluid is was warm and leave the upper half with no fluid cold. Am I overthinking this or what? It's just a bunch of tubes and fluid should flow freely? Maybe the shop didn't do anything with my radiator and it's still clogged (at least the bottom half)? That could explain why the entire radiator is incredibly hot when it overflows when I get off the highway?

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by 85stanggt; 01-12-2019 at 09:31 AM.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  8. #83
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    You state the problem seem to start after you changed the intake gaskets. So lets start there. What brand of gaskets did you use? Part number will help.
    I take it you didn't change the thermostat until late in this trouble shooting process? Or did you put one in also when you did the gaskets? If that was the case, did you put it in the correct direction? Pointed end points to the radiator.

    Your wasting your time with the antifreeze testing, it's not going to be your problem. You can run straight water and it won't change anything. Actually straight water will work better than antifreeze. Antifreeze is just that, it also helps keep metal from rusting and raises the boiling point. But water alone will cool better. The radiator cap will raise the boiling point of water by pressurizing it.

    As for the temperatures your seeing at the radiator from side to side, that is correct. The water flows from passengers side to drivers side. So it will be hot on passengers side and cooler on drivers side. Not top to bottom.

    Picture of your water pump will show if it's a CW or CCW rotation pump. You can tell the difference between the two.

    As I stated before, it sounds like a head gasket leaking under load when running harder on the highway. At highway speeds you have better radiator cooling air flow, then when you get off, the airflow through the radiator is dropped in city driving. Then you start to see the temps rise.

    Last question, are the head gaskets stock?

  9. #84
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Intake gaskets were the good ones JACook recommends with the steel core and silicone end gaskets Felpro MS95952. Installed with only rtv in the corners as the Ford book says.

    Themostat and housing was changed first once the overflowing happened.

    Here's a pic of the pump that came off. Looks just like the one I put on:

    Head gaskets are stock. Never been touched.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  10. #85
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    Alright, let me give you a scenario of what might have happened. You saw a coolant leak and changed the intake gaskets. Since then you are having a over heating problem.

    For the scenario now. Head gasket starts to leak under driving load. Pressure builds up in engine and causes intake gasket to fail. With failed gasket, engine is now open to the atmosphere. Any pressure in coolant system from leaking head gasket is vented to atmosphere through intake leak. No pressure is built up in coolant system.

    New intake gaskets replaced, now leaking head gasket is pressurizing coolant system and putting exhaust gasses into coolant system under cruising loads. This in turn is now forcing coolant out and into overflow tank. Now engine has air in coolant system and causes engine to over heat.

    To test this theory, loosen radiator cap and drive car as before that made it over heat. If it doesn't over heat, or take a lot longer to over heat, you have a blown head gasket.

    If you have ever seen a stock head gasket on these engines, you will see that it is a metal core with a graphite type cover. When removed, this material sticks to the heads and block. There will blow with time and there are a lot of miles on yours.

  11. #86

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    I believe he has already tested for exhaust gasses in the coolant.
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  12. #87
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
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    Using green version coolant?
    I always drop the bottom radiator hose into a large deep tub to empty blocks after radiator is drained..
    A little bit of compressed air into the block helps move things along.
    Have always used nothing but stock Motorcraft caps (never had to replace any) and t-stats.
    If radiator is old, may have to replace it. Cleaning helps, but no one can see inside to verify all is well.
    Last edited by gr79; 01-13-2019 at 12:57 PM.

  13. #88
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    The gas test in the coolant wasn't done at highway speeds under load, when I say the problem is occurring. It's not a radiator problem, it's a head gasket.

  14. #89
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    I did do the gas test when I got home and the system was overflowing under pressure. I bled off the pressure and then remived the cap and stuck the tester in. Would there be enough remnant gas in there to trigger the test fluid?

    I'm starting to get concerned it is a head gasket, but I'm also not sure now how good of a job they did on my radiator.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  15. #90

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    At any point contaminated antifreeze should trigger the test.
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  16. #91

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    If I were you, before I pulled the intake or your water pump (I am still suspect since the internets don't suggest that water pump you have for post 85 cars (all of which would be serpentine), I would suck it up and get a new radiator. If it is just a matter of the partial block not allowing it to do its job under load conditions you should know your answer with a quick and easy radiator replacement. The radiator or water pump problem makes sense to me because the engine is a massive cast iron heat sink, as the highway work builds up the temp, a cavitating pump, or a partially bypassed radiator, will no longer be able to cool it, and after you go back down to town driving the radiator or pump still can't cool or move the coolant enough to get rid of all that heat in the block.

    I still can't get the post where you said the lower radiator hose was hotter than the upper out of my head. Have you checked that again when the engine was spitting? That must have been just a bad temp measurement. Even without a working pump, your upper should be hotter than the lower.
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  17. #92
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    The only other problem may be the new intake gasket is leaking coolant into one of the front or rear intake runners. Can you smell coolant coming from the exhaust? How did you torque down the intake ? How many times did you go through the sequence? You usually need to go around it 3 to 4 times. If you want to try something to see if it might be a head gasket, re-torque the head bolts. Follow the torque sequence, loosen one bolt at a time, and re-torque it, then the next one. After they all have been torqued, go to the top row and torque them 10 pounds higher than the lower ones. Start in the middle and work your way out to the ends. Everyone should be torquing the top row 10 pounds higher than the lower bolts. This is because when you torque the intake down, it pulls away some of the torque from the top row of head bolts. This was figured out back in the 80's.

    I still say it's a head gasket! I don't care what your tester says. I have never even heard of such a thing until now. I know there are dye test for the fluids that use a black light, but not the test you are talking about. I have had this type of head gasket problems when running a blower. It would only leak under high load. Exact same scenario your describing. At the start of this post about three others told you the same thing as I am doing now. Heads can be pulled off and put back on in an afternoon, especially a carbed motor. I use to pull an engine in less than an hour in my driveway back in my younger days.

  18. #93
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gr79 View Post
    Using green version coolant?
    I always drop the bottom hose to empty blocks.
    A little bit of compressed air helps move things along. 5-10 psi.
    Have always used nothing but stock Motorcraft caps (never had to replace any) and t-stats.
    Assuming system is holding pressure.Still using originals, all is well car an
    If radiator is old, may have to replace it. Cleaning helps, but no one can see inside to verify all is well.
    Yes green version coolant. I will try your compressed air trick and pull the lower hose. Where do you put the air in...the upper hose? It should get past the t-stat? Replacing the radiator may be the easiest option at this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by emerygt350 View Post
    If I were you, before I pulled the intake or your water pump (I am still suspect since the internets don't suggest that water pump you have for post 85 cars (all of which would be serpentine), I would suck it up and get a new radiator. If it is just a matter of the partial block not allowing it to do its job under load conditions you should know your answer with a quick and easy radiator replacement. The radiator or water pump problem makes sense to me because the engine is a massive cast iron heat sink, as the highway work builds up the temp, a cavitating pump, or a partially bypassed radiator, will no longer be able to cool it, and after you go back down to town driving the radiator or pump still can't cool or move the coolant enough to get rid of all that heat in the block.

    I still can't get the post where you said the lower radiator hose was hotter than the upper out of my head. Have you checked that again when the engine was spitting? That must have been just a bad temp measurement. Even without a working pump, your upper should be hotter than the lower.
    I think I will do the radiator next. It is insanely easy and far easier to do than ripping the intake back off or pulling the heads. I was wondering if the pump was cavitating, and that's why I was wondering if the Freezetone may be playing a factor also, since it seemed to flash over randomly when I was heating it. If it flashed to gas randomly in the engine, that could lead to excess pressure, poor cooling, and contribute to the overflow issue. It could be a combination of that and an old radiator.

    Can you tell if the pictures I posted above are reverse rotation pump? I was trying to think about how the fins would act spinning each way once that back plate is on the pump. It seemed to make sense with the fins going counter-clockwise, but I don't know. Anyone have a picture of the impeller of a reverse vs standard rotation pump?

    I don't remember the post with the lower hose. It may have been a bad measurement. I noticed though, when I felt the radiator the other day, it was hot vs cold passenger to driver side. Then after sitting a while, the temperature started to creep over to the driver's side probably just by heat transfer through the brass itself. A clogged/poor radiator would explain all the issues I'm having. Not only that, the radiator is scalding hot on top when the coolant overflows, which would make sense because the coolant is hot, but the fan and air should be cooling it down better than that.

    Quote Originally Posted by dynodon64 View Post
    The only other problem may be the new intake gasket is leaking coolant into one of the front or rear intake runners. Can you smell coolant coming from the exhaust? How did you torque down the intake ? How many times did you go through the sequence? You usually need to go around it 3 to 4 times. If you want to try something to see if it might be a head gasket, re-torque the head bolts. Follow the torque sequence, loosen one bolt at a time, and re-torque it, then the next one. After they all have been torqued, go to the top row and torque them 10 pounds higher than the lower ones. Start in the middle and work your way out to the ends. Everyone should be torquing the top row 10 pounds higher than the lower bolts. This is because when you torque the intake down, it pulls away some of the torque from the top row of head bolts. This was figured out back in the 80's.

    I still say it's a head gasket! I don't care what your tester says. I have never even heard of such a thing until now. I know there are dye test for the fluids that use a black light, but not the test you are talking about. I have had this type of head gasket problems when running a blower. It would only leak under high load. Exact same scenario your describing. At the start of this post about three others told you the same thing as I am doing now. Heads can be pulled off and put back on in an afternoon, especially a carbed motor. I use to pull an engine in less than an hour in my driveway back in my younger days.
    Definitely no coolant smell in the exhaust. No coolant in oil and no oil in coolant.

    I replaced the intake gaskets and set the intake down with 4 long threaded rods in the intake holes. I set the intake down using those for guidance. I torqued down according to the sequence in the factory Ford repair manual. I always go over the sequence at least 3 times. (I'm OCD about this stuff).

    I'm afraid of messing with the head bolts, because I feel like that is just opening a huge can of worms after 30 years being on there.

    You're not alone with the head gasket recommendation. A friend of my dad's who builds hot rods said the same thing after I described my symptoms.

    The tester is like a large test tube. It has a rubber cone end with one way valve so that you can fill the tester to the specified level with the blue test fluid, then put the rubber cap on top and pull a vacuum on the test tube to draw air through the fluid. If there are any combustion gasses, the fluid will change color due to the chemical reaction of (I believe) CO and the test fluid. I bought the Lisle tester on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    They are supposedly very accurate, as the chemical reaction is just that. I kept it on for 2 minutes in some cases just in case there were trace amounts of combustion gases in there that needed time to react. I read that in the instructions for some other testers. If it doesn't react in 2 minutes, you're clear.
    Last edited by 85stanggt; 01-13-2019 at 09:55 AM.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  19. #94

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    I have had many mechanics immediately jump to head gaskets on mine as well, even when it was just a poorly operating thermostat (they didn't want to believe a new motorcraft thermostat wasn't working). I would always go with the simplest explanation first. If you aren't smelling it, seeing it, or running like it, I wouldn't go running to a blown head gasket... Not yet at least.
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  20. #95

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    I agree that this stinks of a larger problem.

    If the radiator is suspect, change it now. It may not solve much but it just might, and you need a good radiator. Cooling systems were marginal from day one. I could cause any of the foxes Iíve owned or currently own to overheat simply by adding more than 13.5 degrees of timing base advance.

    You are getting down to where there are only so many things it can be and itís all definately starting to point in one certain direction. Head gaskets do just let go but itís most common when there is a temp or mixture problem driving the engine towards failure.

    Regasketing an old motor is done fairly frequently. Be aware while you are torn into it that one part or another may be cracked - check what you can.

    My car was bracket raced for 2 full seasons and has received a shot or two of NOS along the way too. Iíve always ran Prestone antifreeze and Iíve always kept it changed every few years to ensure the anticorrosive additives are in the system. Knock on wood I have not touched my head gaskets and to my knowledge neither did the previous owner. Iím near 1/2 million miles for what itís worth.
    Last edited by erratic50; 01-13-2019 at 11:04 AM.

  21. #96
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
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    "compressed air trick and pull the lower hose. Where do you put the air in...the upper hose? It should get past the t-stat?"

    Just a thought. To get rid of residual coolant a much as possible.
    Was just thinking air may work up front too, but trapped water may just blow around in block using air.

    Once used very low pressure air to finish emptying the fuel tank. Worked quick.
    Air into the filler neck, fuel came out the disconnected pickup hose. Then dumped gal of fresh to finish flush.
    Of course the disconnected fuel hose size is a lot smaller than a rad hose.

    Using water, t- stat heater inlet hose barb would be ok. Disconnect heater inlet hose from block.
    The heater hose inlet hose bypasses the thermostat.
    Can use that hole. Or say, the coolant temp sensor hole, for access to water jacket.

    Water back flush. For the small amount of coolant settled in lower block pockets.
    Bottom hose off at radiator, large plastic tub under hose end.
    Funnel a gallon or two of good water directly into block via t-stat heater hose barb or other cooling jacket hole.
    Tub is super handy for radiator work, brake jobs, catching fluids, debris, dropped parts. Clears stock height chassis.
    Lowes 6.00
    Attachment 125889
    Last edited by gr79; 01-13-2019 at 02:15 PM.

  22. #97
    FEP Super Member gr79's Avatar
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    Default Ford water pump type ID

    Last edited by gr79; 01-13-2019 at 02:51 PM.

  23. #98

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    Hmmm... I think we may be on to something, I just found this describing your pump as clockwise rotation (standard rotation).
    https://www.autopartswarehouse.com/e...irtex/awaw4024
    1984.5 G.T.350 5.0 CFI AOD Convertible (TRX package, loaded)
    Hooker Super Comp Shorty Equal Length Headers
    GT40 heads, Edelbrock 3721, K&N filter in stock dual snorkel,
    Comp cams XE254H, hypereutectic pistons, catted BBK H-pipe, full custom duals.
    3.73 rear. CS5 225/60/15 on 10 holes (street) Federal 595 rs-rr 225/45/15 on 10 holes (race)
    Everything else stock and fully functional.

  24. #99
    FEP Power Member 85stanggt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gr79 View Post
    Thanks. Good links.

    Quote Originally Posted by emerygt350 View Post
    Hmmm... I think we may be on to something, I just found this describing your pump as clockwise rotation (standard rotation).
    https://www.autopartswarehouse.com/e...irtex/awaw4024
    This is getting more interesting. I was talking to my dad on the phone today about this exact scenario. I know we mentioned it before in this thread, but everywhere I look seems to list this as the part number for my car. And it's the same impeller as the one that came off that didn't have issues until my intake job. Even though I didn't have this issue with the old pump, it may have been the wrong one itself for years. I got that at a local parts store somewhere between '06-'08. The listings for my car may be incorrect in all of these parts locations.

    I have seen standard and reverse listings for that AW4024 pump in my searches.

    First thing I'm going to do tomorrow is call Airtex. Because on their website, the two Airtex water pump part numbers do not specify rotation type on the web. The ASC pumps, however, do specify reverse vs standard rotation. The WP-572 ASC pump is "standard rotation" and the WP-649 ASC pump is listed as "reverse rotation".

    RockAuto lists the AW4024 that I have for a "carb" car and AW4035 for fuel injection. But then in the alternate part numbers, it lists ASC WP-572 as alternate for AW4024. But WP-572 is listed on ASC/Airtex website as STANDARD rotation. WP-649 is the alternate for the FI AW4035 pump, but on ASC/Airtex website is listed as REVERSE rotation. So what's the deal with all of this crazy listing stuff? And why would a carb vs FI car have a different pump?

    Then I go to Gates water pump website, and it lists 2 pumps for my car: 43264 and 43053. Rockauto lists both of those also. Both Gates and Rockauto list them both as standard rotation. Is this a joke? Why are they even an option on a car that doesn't use a standard rotation pump?

    Then there's the ACDelco water pump. Rockauto lists 252620. ACDelco lists that same one for non-CFI cars. All it says is 3.5" 6 vane impeller. Nothing about rotation. The other ACDelco pump is 252169 but that says 4.4" 8 vane impeller for CFI cars. No mention of rotation.

    GMB's listings don't mention rotation direction. But they do cross-reference Airtex part numbers and say that AW4024 is for carbed cars.

    Wow talk about confusing.
    1985 Mustang GT Convertible
    Stock and original @ 213k, except for dynomax ultraflos.

  25. #100
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    As for the pump being the correct rotation type for your car, you said that the pump you are showing was on for how long?, and it never overheated?
    What does that tell you?

    The radiator sounds like it is working just fine. If it was bad, it would not even cool when running down the highway. If you ran it longer on the high way than just to work 6 miles away, it will most likely over heat right now. That still tells me head gasket.

    As for breaking head bolts when pulling it apart, what did the intake bolts look like that went through the water jacket in the front and rear? If they were rusted away badly, then you might see the same on the bottom row bolts by the threads. If the intake bolt were clean, then the head bolts will be fine. I have never had a head bolt break on any engine i took apart. Only engines that sat in a junk yard that was open the the elements did I ever see anything close to that.

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