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  1. #26

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    For what its worth check out the build thread of my 83 Tbird.
    http://vb.foureyedpride.com/showthre...83-Tbird-build

    I converted mine to a 5.0 and used a stock 90 mustang harness then bought a plug and play MicroSquirt kit from EFI Source for under $500 shipped to my door. Super simple to use and tons of features. Rest of my conversion is just OEM take off parts that are easy to find.
    Brian R. of Michigan
    83 TBird 5.0
    88 Ranger 2.3t
    http://vb.foureyedpride.com/showthre...83-Tbird-build

  2. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by deathbypsi View Post
    For what its worth check out the build thread of my 83 Tbird.
    http://vb.foureyedpride.com/showthre...83-Tbird-build

    I converted mine to a 5.0 and used a stock 90 mustang harness then bought a plug and play MicroSquirt kit from EFI Source for under $500 shipped to my door. Super simple to use and tons of features. Rest of my conversion is just OEM take off parts that are easy to find.
    Nice build.

    Jess
    Currently own;
    1979 Mustang, v6 swapped to EFI 393, custom installed m122 blower, 4r70w trans, Megasquirt II, T-top swaped in.
    Previously owned;
    1990 Mustang, 545 BBF, C-4 with brake, ladder bars.
    1983 Mustang, 1984 SVO Mustang
    1984 Mustang convertible, v6 swapped to 351
    1986 Mustang GT, 1989 Mustang GT convertible
    1992 Mustang coupe, 4 swapped to 302

  3. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by 83gt351w View Post
    He's using a Fast EFI. Similar to the Holley Sniper kit. It looks just like a carb. This isn't a retro 5.0 GT40/etc type efi install.
    Thanks for all of the excellent suggestions guys, but Dave is right. This is using the FAST Ez-EFI setup I already have and not going to a factory style setup or other aftermarket system.

    A couple of questions that maybe you all can help me with.

    1) Will a factory pump be sufficient for this? I'm wondering if will I be able to supply a constant 43# to the injectors that supposedly have an 88gpm/hr @ 60 psi rating throughout the throttle range.

    2) I need a 12v switched trigger wire to this system to power up the ECU. This needs to be powered in On/Run and Crank. What would be the best wire to tap into here without worrying about overloading or complications with other systems?
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  4. #29
    Moderator wraithracing's Avatar
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    Since you probably need to purchase a new fuel pump anyway, I would just go with a stock in tank style Walbro pump. You can go with a slightly larger pump such as the 110LPH or 155LPH to be safe depending on your long term goals. Either should work just fine for your needs and supply plenty of fuel at the required pressure.

    It's been awhile since I tapped into an OEM fuse panel, but there should be some Ignition ON wires available in the fuse panel that are not even used. That is what I generally look for when adding additional electrical items. You can verify if they share power with anything else with the Electrical Diagrams, but generally you will be fine.

    Good Luck!
    ​Trey

    "I Don't build it hoping for your approval! I built it because it meets mine!"

    "I've spent most of my money on Mustangs, racing, and women... the rest I just wasted."

    Mustangs Past: Too many to remember!
    Current Mustangs:
    1969 Mach 1
    1979 Pace Car now 5.0/5 speed
    1982 GT Awaiting Restoration
    1984 SVO Restoration in Progress
    1986 GT Wrecked by PO, but still want to save!

    Current Capris:
    1982 Capri Roller
    1984 Capri Returned to Bubble Back Glory
    1983-84 Gloy Racing Trans Am/IMSA Body Parts

  5. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by wraithracing View Post
    Since you probably need to purchase a new fuel pump anyway, I would just go with a stock in tank style Walbro pump. You can go with a slightly larger pump such as the 110LPH or 155LPH to be safe depending on your long term goals. Either should work just fine for your needs and supply plenty of fuel at the required pressure.
    That's where things get a bit confusing. It seems there are no set standards to how the fuel pump manufacturers rate these things. some are rated at the LPH at a set pressure and some are rated as free flow. Even the manufacturers don't have symmetry in their own lines. Walbro does theirs both ways even but don't have the calculations for both ways.

    Sooooooo.....this leads me to this. The setup I bought, used of course, has a fairly new looking pump in it that tests good. The best research I can do on it leads me to believe that it is an Airtex E2061 pump. It is rated between 40-50 GPH free flow which puts it at 151 LPH at the 40 GPH #. Obviously this # drops as the pressure increases but how much is unknown to me for this pump. I'm at a cross roads as I would hate to spend additional money on a new pump if the other manufacturers are around the same specs. At the same time, I'm not sure how reliable these pumps are as the reviews are all over the board and I would hate to have to drop the tank again anytime soon. I guess it could be a gamble either way.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  6. #31
    FEP Senior Member droopie85gt's Avatar
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    Let's ask a question...what are your horsepower goals? Do you plan on a turbo or blower? It it's less than 400 hp and no power adder a stock pump will work all day long. If you say yes to power adders, get a 155lph like Wraith mentioned and be done with it. An in tank pump with the stock fuel lines will support 400-500 hp. The stock type in tank pump will be quieter, neater, and easier to live with. To find a good place to tie in a hot wire in crank AND run use a test light or a meter and crank the car over if still possible.

    My brother threw away my notes from mine. If in doubt get a wiring diagram (stickied on this site) and check for ignition leads. Stock they have to be hot in crank and run.
    1985 GT, Sunroof, 5 Lug, Rear Discs, 01 Graphite Bullets, 88 forged piston shortblock, 2.02/1.60 Alum heads, Weiand Stealth, Holley C950 TBI, BBK Long tubes

  7. #32
    Moderator wraithracing's Avatar
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    If you aren't doing any mods to your existing engine, the either a standard 88LPH. or the 110LPH will be just fine. As stated you can add the 155 LPH and still be just fine. Yes it will be more fuel than you need, but any excess will be returned to the tank, so really no harm no foul.

    If you are planning on upgrading the engine now or in the future, then I would definitely consider the 155 LPH and possible the 255 LPH if you plan on major upgrades. That would prevent you from having to swap out the pump at a later date.

    As for the current pump, I can't help in regards to reliability or durability.
    ​Trey

    "I Don't build it hoping for your approval! I built it because it meets mine!"

    "I've spent most of my money on Mustangs, racing, and women... the rest I just wasted."

    Mustangs Past: Too many to remember!
    Current Mustangs:
    1969 Mach 1
    1979 Pace Car now 5.0/5 speed
    1982 GT Awaiting Restoration
    1984 SVO Restoration in Progress
    1986 GT Wrecked by PO, but still want to save!

    Current Capris:
    1982 Capri Roller
    1984 Capri Returned to Bubble Back Glory
    1983-84 Gloy Racing Trans Am/IMSA Body Parts

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by droopie85gt View Post
    Let's ask a question...what are your horsepower goals? Do you plan on a turbo or blower? It it's less than 400 hp and no power adder a stock pump will work all day long. If you say yes to power adders, get a 155lph like Wraith mentioned and be done with it. An in tank pump with the stock fuel lines will support 400-500 hp. The stock type in tank pump will be quieter, neater, and easier to live with. To find a good place to tie in a hot wire in crank AND run use a test light or a meter and crank the car over if still possible.

    My brother threw away my notes from mine. If in doubt get a wiring diagram (stickied on this site) and check for ignition leads. Stock they have to be hot in crank and run.
    Quote Originally Posted by wraithracing View Post
    If you aren't doing any mods to your existing engine, the either a standard 88LPH. or the 110LPH will be just fine. As stated you can add the 155 LPH and still be just fine. Yes it will be more fuel than you need, but any excess will be returned to the tank, so really no harm no foul.

    If you are planning on upgrading the engine now or in the future, then I would definitely consider the 155 LPH and possible the 255 LPH if you plan on major upgrades. That would prevent you from having to swap out the pump at a later date.

    As for the current pump, I can't help in regards to reliability or durability.
    Thanks for the feedback guys. The short of it is that, at this time, power adders are not on the horizon. I'm way to deep in damage control to think about any extra goodies. I think I'm going to chance this pump and setup for the time being and hope I made the right choice. I still have to get the pressure regulator and connecting hoses so I'm going to be out another couple hundred bucks if I go new on it. After last night, I'm wondering why I thought going this route was going to be a good idea. It has turned into an unexpected MONEY PIT.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  9. #34
    Moderator wraithracing's Avatar
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    Working on cars = MONEY PIT!

    Modifying cars = Never Ending MONEY PIT!
    ​Trey

    "I Don't build it hoping for your approval! I built it because it meets mine!"

    "I've spent most of my money on Mustangs, racing, and women... the rest I just wasted."

    Mustangs Past: Too many to remember!
    Current Mustangs:
    1969 Mach 1
    1979 Pace Car now 5.0/5 speed
    1982 GT Awaiting Restoration
    1984 SVO Restoration in Progress
    1986 GT Wrecked by PO, but still want to save!

    Current Capris:
    1982 Capri Roller
    1984 Capri Returned to Bubble Back Glory
    1983-84 Gloy Racing Trans Am/IMSA Body Parts

  10. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by wraithracing View Post
    Working on cars = MONEY PIT!

    Modifying cars = Never Ending MONEY PIT!
    Ironically somehow that made me feel a little better.

    I know this but dang it's been a snowball.....wait scratch that......an avalanche on this project.

    Ashes to ashes, dust to dust
    Underhood electrical has turned to crust.

    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  11. #36

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    Anyways a bit back on topic.

    I have mocked, setup and installed most of the system up to the fuel tank. Waiting on a new fuel level sender and from there I will install the system for the tank.

    Before anyone says anything......YES the engine will be fully cleaned before final commissioning.

    Starting at the front, I installed the TB and ran the electrical trying to make it as neat and tidy as possible while retaining a somewhat factoryish look. I picked up a firewall grommet from a J/Y 96 Mustang to see if it would work. While not perfect, it seals good. I did have to split the grommet, as the harness is to large to fit through the grommet hole, but it will seal up fine.

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    It took me a bit to figure out where to mount the ECU and harness once it came inside, but I ended up mounting it cockeyed in the P/S kick panel. I think this location should work good for access and space. The carbed cars panel is a bit different from an EFI car as there is a difference in the design and space between the two.

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    Last edited by 84StangSVT; 01-30-2017 at 08:56 AM.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  12. #37

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    Next up is the fuel system wiring.

    This was a total shot in the dark for me and not a lot of good information that I found. So feel free to comment, suggest options or what not.

    I will be running the fuel pumps main power from a fused connection to the battery. The trigger comes from the ECU. Fast does include a pre-wired connector that is used with their fuel pump kit, but since I don't have a loose connector that matches, I will not use their function and leave it abandoned and intact for future use if needed.

    For the main power wire to the relay, I ran a #14 wire. I chose this size as this is what both the relay and inertia switch have. I looked at the length of the run and I should be good to carry up to 20 amps continuous on this wire. I'm not sure how much amperage a pump pulls, but I would be surprised if it is that much.

    Ran both the trigger and main power wire around the car utilizing the same route as the other wires and secured.

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    Got a lot of conflicting information on the internet about the way the relay and inertia switch should be wired. It was about a 50/50 split on which one comes first in the series. I dug up some schematics from both 96 and 91 and it appeared the factory had the inertia switch between the pump and relay. Figured that would be the way to go. Grabbed an inertia switch out of a J/Y 96 Mustang, bought a new relay and base from O'reillys and wired it in. Not knowing where to put this, I figured wiring the 2 up side by side in the spare tire compartment seemed like the thing to do. It should be protected and still easy to get to if I need.

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    Tested the functions of the relay and inertia switch and both work as intended.
    Last edited by 84StangSVT; 01-31-2017 at 09:11 AM.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  13. #38

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    That's all until I can get the fuel tank in, put the dash back in to find a system trigger, run the O2 sensor wiring and put the ignition coil back in to run the RPM module coil signal wiring.
    Last edited by 84StangSVT; 01-30-2017 at 08:58 AM.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  14. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by 84StangSVT View Post
    Starting at the front, I installed the TB and ran the electrical trying to make it as neat and tidy as possible while retaining a somewhat factoryish look. I picked up a firewall grommet from a J/Y 96 Mustang to see if it would work. While not perfect, it seals good. I did have to split the grommet, as the harness is to large to fit through the grommet hole, but it will seal up fine.

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    Let me hit back on this picture for a minute, I forgot to mention something.

    Look back up at the little black box on the P/S cowl area by that dual solenoid thing....which I'm not sure what that is yet.

    That little box with the black/yellow/white wires is the RPM Module for this system. It is a noise filter of sorts for stock and HEI systems. Since I'm running a stock ignition, I need this little important piece to send a clean signal to the ECU. If I was running an aftermarket ignition box that has the "tach signal" output, I would not need this as supposedly they produce a clean enough signal to send directly to this system.

    Not a big deal, just thought I should mention this since I forgot it the first time.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  15. #40

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    One thought to the suggestion of a larger than needed pump.... If you go a lot larger than stock and drive your car in hot weather it will produce a lot more fumes inside the tank. I would be sure to at least insulate your fuel lines and keep a decent amount of fuel in the tank so your pump doesn't burn up.

    Ive had issues with vapor lock and also pump failures over the years. Also you would be amazed how much pressure can build up in a tank full of fumes.

  16. #41
    Moderator wraithracing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erratic50 View Post
    One thought to the suggestion of a larger than needed pump.... If you go a lot larger than stock and drive your car in hot weather it will produce a lot more fumes inside the tank. I would be sure to at least insulate your fuel lines and keep a decent amount of fuel in the tank so your pump doesn't burn up.

    Ive had issues with vapor lock and also pump failures over the years. Also you would be amazed how much pressure can build up in a tank full of fumes.
    Obviously running too large a pump is a waste of money and can cause issues. EFI cars always prefer to run a minimum of 1/4 tank of gas or more when possible.

    If you have concerns about fuel return and/or vapors you can extend the return line in the tank down to almost the bottom of the tank, so the fuel returns normally into the liquid fuel rather than dumping on top of the fuel. That helps to prevent aeration of the fuel and lower vapors. You should also make sure your fuel tank vent is in good shape and the hose from the vent isn't clogged or stopped up in anyway. I know others that have lengthened the vent line and routed it as far back as possible to help get any fumes out from under the car. Good Luck!
    ​Trey

    "I Don't build it hoping for your approval! I built it because it meets mine!"

    "I've spent most of my money on Mustangs, racing, and women... the rest I just wasted."

    Mustangs Past: Too many to remember!
    Current Mustangs:
    1969 Mach 1
    1979 Pace Car now 5.0/5 speed
    1982 GT Awaiting Restoration
    1984 SVO Restoration in Progress
    1986 GT Wrecked by PO, but still want to save!

    Current Capris:
    1982 Capri Roller
    1984 Capri Returned to Bubble Back Glory
    1983-84 Gloy Racing Trans Am/IMSA Body Parts

  17. #42

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    Thanks guys. Question, how do these tanks typically vent? I know all last year, I would get some major pressure buildup in the tank. It would build enough you could hear it popping sometimes and the gas cap would take off like Sputnik at the gas pump.

    This car has had a more than likely "half assed" emissions system removal done on it in the past.

    I'm assuming it goes through the vent valve on top of the tank and up to a charcoal canister then on its way. What would be the best way to address this without hooking the emission stuff back up? Does the gas cap affect tank pressure in any ways also?
    Last edited by 84StangSVT; 01-31-2017 at 09:03 AM.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  18. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by 84StangSVT View Post
    Got a lot of conflicting information on the internet about the way the relay and inertia switch should be wired. It was about a 50/50 split on which one comes first in the series. I dug up some schematics from both 96 and 91 and it appeared the factory had the inertia switch between the pump and relay. Figured that would be the way to go. Grabbed an inertia switch out of a J/Y 96 Mustang, bought a new relay and base from O'reillys and wired it in. Not knowing where to put this, I figured wiring the 2 up side by side in the spare tire compartment seemed like the thing to do. It should be protected and still easy to get to if I need.
    Sometimes I tend to think about things way too much. The placement of this switch in the circuit is one of them.

    It's rather interesting really as the 50/50 split in information is founded through researching it. Here's what I have found.

    1984-90 had the inertia switch wired into the relay coil trigger wire
    91+ has the inertia switch wired into fuel pump main power wire after the relay

    Not sure exactly why Ford decided to change the location of it but they did. If I was to throw a guess out there on why, it would be due to issues with the relay sticking during an accident and keeping full power to the pump. Even if the trigger wire was tripped and the coil de-energized, a stuck relay would continue the circuit. In the main pump power circuit, it would prevent this.

    Either way, the one I got is out of a 96 and was wired after the relay, so it should carry the load.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  19. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by 84StangSVT View Post
    Thanks guys. Question, how do these tanks typically vent? I know all last year, I would get some major pressure buildup in the tank. It would build enough you could hear it popping sometimes and the gas cap would take off like Sputnik at the gas pump.

    This car has had a more than likely "half assed" emissions system removal done on it in the past.

    I'm assuming it goes through the vent valve on top of the tank and up to a charcoal canister then on its way. What would be the best way to address this without hooking the emission stuff back up? Does the gas cap affect tank pressure in any ways also?
    Vented gas cap.

    Jess
    Currently own;
    1979 Mustang, v6 swapped to EFI 393, custom installed m122 blower, 4r70w trans, Megasquirt II, T-top swaped in.
    Previously owned;
    1990 Mustang, 545 BBF, C-4 with brake, ladder bars.
    1983 Mustang, 1984 SVO Mustang
    1984 Mustang convertible, v6 swapped to 351
    1986 Mustang GT, 1989 Mustang GT convertible
    1992 Mustang coupe, 4 swapped to 302

  20. #45
    FEP Senior Member droopie85gt's Avatar
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    582

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    My EFI tank I swapped in, I connected the tank vent to the plastic line running to the front passenger side. I went to the JY and snatched a charcoal cannister off an Exploder iirc. I connected it to the charcoal cannister. I don't have any emissions hooked to the cannister but it stopped about 90% of the gas fumes I had in my garage after driving and stopped the tank from popping and the big hiss from the gas cap when it was cracked open!
    1985 GT, Sunroof, 5 Lug, Rear Discs, 01 Graphite Bullets, 88 forged piston shortblock, 2.02/1.60 Alum heads, Weiand Stealth, Holley C950 TBI, BBK Long tubes

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