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  1. #1

    Default Has anyone used a bluetooth device

    I am looking to keep my stock radio intact and functioning, but I want to be able to play music from my smartphone as well. I found a product called Out Of Sight Audio MKII. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with this. I am not seeing many reviews on line for it. It claims to do exactly what I want but it is not cheap (about $290). I am OK with spending that if it works.

    Has anyone else set their car up for Bluetooth while keeping the stock radio? If so what did you use and are you happy with it?
    I really want to keep the car as original as I can. I understand it will not sound great through the stock speakers but I am not looking to get concert quality, I just can not stand listening to the DJs, and the commercials on regular radio.

  2. #2
    FEP Power Member vintageracer's Avatar
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    Not Bluetooth however IF your car has a cassette player you can use one those "Cassettes with a Leash" (wire/plug) and plug it in your phone to use your phone for music. Probably not the best quality however it works good enough for me!

    Not Bluetooth however I have one of the transportable satellite receivers that transmits a signal to your radio to play the satellite channels. Works OK just like the cassette option.

    Not Bluetooth however in each of the above situations I am able to maintain the stock radio in multiple vehicles and attach my phone to those stock old factory radio's for music from my phone or satellite subscription.

    By the way the cassette with a leash option is CHEAP when you get on at TJ Maxx!
    Mike
    Remember, "Drive Fast, Turn Heads, Break Hearts!"

    1995 Ford Powerstroke F350 "Centurion" STRETCHED Crew Cab Dually

    I like "Cut & Coach Built" vehicles!

    www.musclecardeals.com


  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
    Not Bluetooth however IF your car has a cassette player you can use one those "Cassettes with a Leash" (wire/plug) and plug it in your phone to use your phone for music. Probably not the best quality however it works good enough for me!

    Not Bluetooth however I have one of the transportable satellite receivers that transmits a signal to your radio to play the satellite channels. Works OK just like the cassette option.

    Not Bluetooth however in each of the above situations I am able to maintain the stock radio in multiple vehicles and attach my phone to those stock old factory radio's for music from my phone or satellite subscription.

    By the way the cassette with a leash option is CHEAP when you get on at TJ Maxx!

    Thanks, I have used one of those cassette things however my 85 does not have a cassette.

  4. #4

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    There are some companies doing "stock" radios with all the new upgrades. Dont know if they are into the 80's stuff yet. Seen some on Dennis Gages show

  5. #5
    FEP Super Member 84StangSVT's Avatar
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    I have used the FM transmitters plenty over the years, both the 3.5mm plug style and the bluetooth style. IMHO, I prefer the 3.5mm plug style as it drains the battery on my phone (Iphone) less than the bluetooth style. I also believe the sound quality is better with the 3.5mm. There are plenty of styles of the 3.5mm transmitters that range from ones that plug into your cigarette lighter for power and some that run off of batteries for self power. I have one that is made by Energizer that uses 2 AA's and works flawlessly.

    I would rater pay $20-$30 for an FM transmitter than to pay $300 for a dedicated bluetooth receiver, but I'm cheap sometimes.
    Brock
    1984 Mustang LX Convertible 3.8L V-6/Auto (SOLD)
    1984 Mustang GT Hatchback 5.0 V-8/5 Speed

    I'm an FEP Supporter and proud of it. Are you?

  6. #6
    FEP Senior Member 86GTdriver's Avatar
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    One of these days (God knows when), I'm going to retrofit a 94-00 Mach system into my 86, using only the HU, and using the CD slave function to wire up a bluetooth receiver and switch to do this very thing to get the best sound. I've mapped out the wiring diagram and want to make my own conversion harnesses trying to keep the stock wiring intact. It's a long way off, but I'm sure it can be done. The biggest headache honestly is figuring out where those 5x7's for the rear will go. The hatch positions are obviously not an option.

    I know some would say, 'why not just go all aftermarket', well, I say it'd be a fun project. And while I'm at it wire up USB3 charging ports that would be discreetly hidden.
    Last edited by 86GTdriver; 10-15-2016 at 08:17 PM.
    '86 Mustang GT T-Top, well... I got the subframes primed and painted now.
    '96 Mustang Cobra 302rwhp 296rwtq, Sold and missed
    '11 Mustang GT/CS, Traded and will be missed
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  7. #7

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    They have bluetooth cassette adaptars as well. I know one guy that uses one through a 8track cassette adapter.

    My 88 xr7 has a stock premium sound system, and as far as I know stock speakers. It actually sounds really good through a cassette adapter and I have no reason to change it. It even will boom the bass with hardly any distortion.
    For my 86, I plan to use a dvd/bluetooth android stereo as all the wiring was hacked up and I dont care about originality anyways. For the long trips and traveling a dvd playing keeps my kids happy and almost every gas station has a redbox now a days.
    2 1986 cougars (both 4 eyed and 5.0)
    1 1987 cougar

  8. #8
    FEP Senior Member Broncojunkie's Avatar
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    The sound system thing is probably the one area where I just can't take "stock" technology. There are a lot of cheap receivers out now that do all kinds of stuff. But I'm pretty simple. All new cd head units these days will read MP3 format. So I burn a cd or two as "data" discs, leaving the songs in mp3 format. You can fit (very roughly) about 200 songs on each disc. If I want more, I have a cheap mp3 player that uses a micro sd card. I think I have 8 gigs on mine and barely using 25% of the storage. I can plug that straight into the newer decks.

    The receivers fit nicely in the "din" style openings, but you'll need to cut out the 3-hole radio openings on the older cars, I believe. But they still make some decent 3-hole head units with similar aftermarket options.

    In my 88gt, I chose to try a different route. I bought a single din receiver that only has a radio, auxiliary input, and SD slot. I always have sd cards lying around, since I run a lot of trail cameras for hunting. I just took one of my smaller 4-gig cards and loaded a ton of music on it. My only issue with this setup is that the unit itself is very cheaply made. I couldn't seem to find a similar product made by a major brand. It sounds like garbage, but only because the speakers are factory and half of them don't work. I just haven't gotten around to replacing them yet. On the plus side, the unit only cost me around $20 shipped (brand new). I could spend a couple hundred bucks on new speakers and a small 4-channel amp and have some respectable sound.

    As long as you aren't chopping up the original dash harness, replacing it with factory system is a breeze. You simply unplug it from the adaptor harness and reinstall the stock radio.

  9. #9

    Default

    Honestly as long as you find something tasteful, aftermarket is really the way to go. I have a Kenwood KDC-BT562U in my 86. It took just a couple hours to install (but the guy before me had already put in an aftermarket radio so...) and when I bought it a couple years ago from crutchfield (originally for my Sebring) it was only $120 and included all the install goodies. It has bluetooth, USB, line-in, sounds great, built in EQ, etc. And it has RGB lighting so I could set it to match my gauges perfectly in both the Sebring and the Mustang (Sebring was some weird turquoisey color).

    But if you're hell bent on factory.... I would say FM transmitter is the way to go. You could stick it to the bottom of the center console and run a 3.5MM extension out of it. You could possibly try to find one you could hardwire so it shuts off with the car??

    My dad has an old school kenwood with cassette and he had to replace it for a twin because the first one got completely f*cked up by one of those cassette to line in pieces of junk they sell at every Walmart and gas station in the nation. I would strongly suggest avoiding these if you want your radio to function in a month or two...

  10. #10

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    Ive been using the same cassette adapter for probably 5 years and three cars. Got it at the dollar store.
    2 1986 cougars (both 4 eyed and 5.0)
    1 1987 cougar

  11. #11
    FEP Power Member smitty54's Avatar
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    Have you looked at something like this?
    http://www.discountcarstereo.com/iS335.html

    "Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone driving faster than you is a maniac."
    George Carlin, Rest in peace

    Rick
    84 GT Convertible
    68 Cougar XR7
    13 Lincoln MKX

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty54 View Post
    Have you looked at something like this?
    http://www.discountcarstereo.com/iS335.html

    When I had my GTO, I sent my stock radio out to get a 3.5 mm jack like above installed. I think it cost me 80 bucks plus shipping. He was a GTO only guy, but I'm sure a decent stereo place can do it. I had one of those cassette things years ago. Unless the technology has gotten a lot better, they sound lousy. The jack is the easiest solution for true input sound while keeping your stock stereo.

    That being said, I hacked out the shaft holes in my 84 to get a modern 1 din stereo put in. Sometimes I wish I would have gotten an original stock cassette radio and had an input jack put in. But I must admit, I do enjoy the hands free phone and voice command of my Pioneer!
    1984.5 GT 5.0 5 Speed ANALOG
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  13. #13
    Mike1157
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    As an audio guy, it always pains me when I read stuff like this on a forum. Using ANY adapter is just one more erosion of what people accept as decent sound quality.

    Music sources have always been measured by two references: Frequency response, and Signal to noise.

    Frequency response is typically seen as a measurement of the sources ability to reproduce the distance between the lowest low frequency, to the highest high frequency, measured in hertz (Hz)
    The normal human ear can hear a range between 20hz to 20,000 hz (most commonly referred to 20 kilohertz, or 20 khz)
    A super low thud from a bass guitar, kick drum, or bass machine can easily reproduce a 20 hz note, and is more often "felt" by us, rather than heard.
    Conversely, a 20khz note is a super bright ting of a cymbal, or the noise your ear hears as a ping when a tuning fork is struck.

    Every musical instrument, including a human voice falls between those two ranges.

    Signal to Noise is the sources ability to convey that signal w/o adding anything else (in the form of distortion) to that signal conveyance. Think of that as a percentage.

    So, as an example: If you sat in front of band making a recording in a studio environment free from any other noise clutter, that would be 100% authentic. The S/N would be 100db. You'd be able to hear everything, from the lowest low to the highest high.
    A CD copy of that session would be at the 90%, or 90db S/N. The frequency response would be between 10-22khz (beyond human hearing)
    A Cassette copy of that session would be at the 70db S/N. W/ a 30hz-18khz FR. (when played back on a high quality, home cassette deck)
    A FM broadcast of that session would also be around 70db, w/ even less FR more like 30hz-15khz.

    Now, when you add in the old factory radio which was notoriously bad in the mid 80's, you can also subtract about 10% from anything rated above.
    Lastly,...add in the degradation of a cheap adapter, and you get a flaming pile of crap.

    A cheap dollar store cassette adapter will probably show actual S/N in the 60-65db range, w/ a FR somewhere in the 50hz-15khz range
    A FM modulator placed in line of the antenna will be even worse, 55-60db, w/ a lousy FR at 50hz to 13.5-15khz.

    If your radio has an aux input on the back (which some factory head units have) use it. The S/N, and FR will be best that way, as it is a direct audio connection. I cannot tell what that input source is rated at though, but it will be as close to CD quality as you'll get. The pic of that female aux jack wired into the front trim is just a quick way to connect your listening device w/o having a cable laying around that is hooked to the back of the factory aux input.

    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-1mCjqJz...d_quality.html

    When talking about the compressed music files that you have on your phone, and depending on how badly they were compressed will also make for a crappy sounding end result, but that is a whole "Nother" lecture.
    Last edited by Mike1157; 01-07-2017 at 09:10 AM.

  14. #14
    FEP Power Member vintageracer's Avatar
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    I find your information to be very interesting seeing that for me as long as it makes "Noise" I'm good with the radio in my car. Lookie here! It even gets AM!

    I have seen and heard any number of different high end sound systems and yes the sound was incredible! The knowledge of these high end installers and the technology involved in these systems fascinates me to no end however no where near enough to spend the kind of money that is required for this level of audio perfection. After all is still just a car not a concert hall.

    Having said that I also know that there are still "some" of us that consider a speaker upgrade a big deal! There are several vendors here in Tennessee converting older car radios to newer technology and one in Texas for whom I search the JY's for specific GM core radio's. I guess you can say I am interested in the new radio technology. Strictly for the Dollar's!!!

    I look forward to more of your post's educating us all about mobile audio!
    Mike
    Remember, "Drive Fast, Turn Heads, Break Hearts!"

    1995 Ford Powerstroke F350 "Centurion" STRETCHED Crew Cab Dually

    I like "Cut & Coach Built" vehicles!

    www.musclecardeals.com


  15. #15

    Default

    Try this site for starters. There are sooooo many options out there. Just google isimple.

    http://isimple.com/catalog/install/isfm2351
    84 Cougar, 88 HO with 700DP, Edelbrock RPM intake, 1.7 RRs, shorty's and SS exh, T-5, KC clutch, Hurst pro billet, line loc, 8.8, 4.10s, suspension mods....blah, blah,blah.

    71 Comet, 289, Liberty TL, 9", 6.00s, 11.9x @ 112.... blah, blah, blah.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1157 View Post
    As an audio guy, it always pains me when I read stuff like this on a forum. Using ANY adapter is just one more erosion of what people accept as decent sound quality.

    Music sources have always been measured by two references: Frequency response, and Signal to noise.

    Frequency response is typically seen as a measurement of the sources ability to reproduce the distance between the lowest low frequency, to the highest high frequency, measured in hertz (Hz)
    The normal human ear can hear a range between 20hz to 20,000 hz (most commonly referred to 20 kilohertz, or 20 khz)
    A super low thud from a bass guitar, kick drum, or bass machine can easily reproduce a 20 hz note, and is more often "felt" by us, rather than heard.
    Conversely, a 20khz note is a super bright ting of a cymbal, or the noise your ear hears as a ping when a tuning fork is struck.

    Every musical instrument, including a human voice falls between those two ranges.

    Signal to Noise is the sources ability to convey that signal w/o adding anything else (in the form of distortion) to that signal conveyance. Think of that as a percentage.

    So, as an example: If you sat in front of band making a recording in a studio environment free from any other noise clutter, that would be 100% authentic. The S/N would be 100db. You'd be able to hear everything, from the lowest low to the highest high.
    A CD copy of that session would be at the 90%, or 90db S/N. The frequency response would be between 10-22khz (beyond human hearing)
    A Cassette copy of that session would be at the 70db S/N. W/ a 30hz-18khz FR. (when played back on a high quality, home cassette deck)
    A FM broadcast of that session would also be around 70db, w/ even less FR more like 30hz-15khz.

    Now, when you add in the old factory radio which was notoriously bad in the mid 80's, you can also subtract about 10% from anything rated above.
    Lastly,...add in the degradation of a cheap adapter, and you get a flaming pile of crap.

    A cheap dollar store cassette adapter will probably show actual S/N in the 60-65db range, w/ a FR somewhere in the 50hz-15khz range
    A FM modulator placed in line of the antenna will be even worse, 55-60db, w/ a lousy FR at 50hz to 13.5-15khz.

    If your radio has an aux input on the back (which some factory head units have) use it. The S/N, and FR will be best that way, as it is a direct audio connection. I cannot tell what that input source is rated at though, but it will be as close to CD quality as you'll get. The pic of that female aux jack wired into the front trim is just a quick way to connect your listening device w/o having a cable laying around that is hooked to the back of the factory aux input.

    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-1mCjqJz...d_quality.html

    When talking about the compressed music files that you have on your phone, and depending on how badly they were compressed will also make for a crappy sounding end result, but that is a whole "Nother" lecture.
    This is a good post, and spot on.
    2 1986 cougars (both 4 eyed and 5.0)
    1 1987 cougar

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