Close



Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 76 to 92 of 92
  1. #76

    Default

    The good news is that I figured out, definitively, what the problem was. It wasn't the dimmer circuit but that did lead me to the real problem. It was a thick-film resistor network. It's the white thing standing up in the picture below.



    There are three resistor dividers on there, one for each power wire. They drop the voltage to a safe level to feed a pin on that big chip in the middle of the board. The dividers for the dimmer and ignition wires were working properly. It was the third divider that feeds the battery voltage to the chip (I assume for brownout detection) that was drifting. I could watch it with a volt meter drop from 2.5 Volts. As soon at it went below 1.6 Volts the screen would turn off. I could get the voltage above 1.6 Volts briefly by blowing on the resistor network. The screen would come back on until the voltage dropped then the screen would go off again. It looked like it had some cold solder joints so I fired up the soldering iron and re-flowed them. Powered on the Tripminder again and the voltage was still drifting. Now here comes the bad news...

    While checking the voltage, my probe slipped and bridged the gap between pins 2 & 3 on the resistor network which sent full battery voltage to the chip pin, frying the internal protection diode. It's now permanently pulled down with no way to get it out of brownout mode. GAME OVER

  2. #77

    Default

    In case anyone in the future is Googling a similar issue... The plan to fix it was to make a new resistor network point-to-point style using standard through-hole resistors. This is for the resistor network labeled RN-2 on the circuit board, Ford part number E2AF-14A601-ABB.


  3. #78
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Dunedin 9011, New Zealand, South Pacific
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Nice you found a work-a-round. Sad the right action plan accidentily and inadvertantly evidently killed it by ground.

    Thats electronics. Im lucky to have been sorounded by electronics people since child hood. Time to ask for anither Trip Minder and get busy.

  4. #79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xctasy View Post
    Time to ask for anither Trip Minder and get busy.
    Already bought another one off of ebay.

  5. #80

    Default

    The new Tripminder showed up today. It's pretty beat up and the buttons don't work so I'm just going to pull the power board out of it and stick it in the one I've been working on.

    Again, in case anyone in the future is Googling a similar issue, here's what the inverter switching transistor raster is supposed to look like.



    And the correct [rectified] voltages coming out of the transformer are;

    1 = -29 Volts
    5 = 5 Volts
    7 = -31 Volts
    8 = -40 Volts

  6. #81

    Default

    @ Xctasy & Mr Riggs,
    Both of you guys seem very knowledgeable about this topic indeed. Instead of asking questions about it,you should be teaching a class on the subject.Its not something I'll probably ever need,but your insite & info was a interesting read.Thanks for the technical info.

  7. #82
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Dunedin 9011, New Zealand, South Pacific
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wbrockstar View Post
    @ Xctasy & Mr Riggs,
    Both of you guys seem very knowledgeable about this topic indeed. Instead of asking questions about it,you should be teaching a class on the subject.Its not something I'll probably ever need,but your insite & info was a interesting read.Thanks for the technical info.
    Most of the matters aren't finding info...its finding space on the dash to mount the thing. On big S cars, the Sterling based cars which started off as Tbrids and XR7's, the dash tub was the same as the 1980's cars, so heaps of space for a pseudo message center.


    On Mustangs, you have to do a center air vent delete to get the TripMinder or Clock based system to the same spot as and S shell.

    Mustang




    s shell



  8. #83

    Default

    It occurred to me that the chip on the power board isn't what multiplexes the grids, so it must be sending a signal to the chip on the display board to tell it to stop. With the working power board, I checked the voltages on all the pins that go between the two boards (J1). Then I plugged in the power board that I broke and compared the readings. All readings were the same except Pin-5 (red) and Pin-6 (purple). Both were reading low on the broken board but high (+5 Volts) on the good power board. I pulled the purple wire out of the connector and it made no difference. I pulled the red wire out of the connector and the display came on. I then plugged the purple wire back in and again it didn't make any difference. Not sure what the purple wire is for but everything seems to be working with just the red wire disconnected. Both wires have their own pull-ups, the chip on the power board just pulls them down.



    So there you go. If you ever have a Tripminder with a dead display, no need to fabricate a resistor network, just unplug the red wire (J1 Pin-5).
    Last edited by mrriggs; 07-14-2020 at 07:32 PM.

  9. #84
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Dunedin 9011, New Zealand, South Pacific
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Um, hombre, does that mean you have like two functioning Trip Minders? I'm sure T1 is fused though, eh?

    The scope is what I use to poll ignition triggers. They are great for digital and analogue low voltage triggers, and on my Sun Engine analyzer, really good for 40 kv coil packs and stuff.

    The multiplexing for VF is complicated because I'm certain Ford was aiming for a list of functions, and things like killing the glare at night and probably planning to use it for fault code logging meant the VF tube had heaps of features deemed "critical to the mission".

    In 1980, the Panther Lincoln and Marquis introduced a digital trip computer (an option, replacing the analog clock in the dashboard), but it was first a Fox body thing in the Sterling Specialty Coupes.

    1980-1989 Crown Victoria/Grand Marquis
    1980-1982 Thunderbird/XR7
    1983-1986 Thunderbird/Cougar
    1983-1986 LTD/Marquis

    I'll bet they decided on a Saturday morning meeting to curtail a whole bunch of stuff when EEC III came out in on the 1980 Lincoln Continental 5-liter 302 , and then kept the display. Are there any earlier than E0 part number codes....I see a bunch of E2 part number codes?.


    The Miles to Empty indicator for 1979 Lincolns was red VF, maybee a repurposed Fox 78 Message Center clock.



    https://www.mcecars.com/vehicles/259...lincoln-mark-v





    Betcha the display has been the same since the first onboard Lincoln trip minder on the downsized 1980 Panther, non Screaming Baroque Mini Land Yacht.

  10. #85

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xctasy View Post
    Um, hombre, does that mean you have like two functioning Trip Minders?
    Yup.

    I'm sure T1 is fused though, eh?
    T1?

    Are there any earlier than E0 part number codes....I see a bunch of E2 part number codes?.
    There is a single diode with a D9 part number. EVERYTHING else is E2.

  11. #86
    FEP Super Member xctasy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Dunedin 9011, New Zealand, South Pacific
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xctasy View Post
    Um, hombre, does that mean you have like two functioning Trip Minders? I'm sure T1 is fused though, eh?

    T1= TripMinder 1. Terminator 1 didn't die!


    You new TripMinder is the Terminator 2. Make sure the T1 doesn't kill the T2. It could be epic Sibling Rivalry....

  12. #87

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xctasy View Post
    T1= TripMinder 1. Terminator 1 didn't die!


    You new TripMinder is the Terminator 2. Make sure the T1 doesn't kill the T2. It could be epic Sibling Rivalry....
    Ha ha, now I got it.

    Well, T2 just donated it's heart to T1 and it's a nasty, crusty old bugger. Looks like it spent most of it's life in the bottom of a toolbox. Poor guy was probably ripped from a luxurious Lincoln. No, if there's any vengeance to be had, I'm sure it's T2 I gotta keep an eye on.

  13. #88

    Default

    Hello, since this appears to be the most current thread about Tripminder, I'm going to post some information.

    Currently installing Tripminder into a 1994 Ford Flareside XLT 351w E4OD SpeedDensity KID2 EEC-IV.
    No documents on pinout for #34, but the code exists.

    The specific hardware switch is LINK_SW, and can be configured for both DOL and DCL if the EEC-IV is equipped.
    Code:
    DCL HARDWARE PRESENT SWITCHES
    
    Hardware present switches define the types of devices connected  to  the EEC module through the wiring harness.  (See also DCL Chapter)
    
          LINK_SW 00 -> UART MODE disabled / no DOL, no DCL
                  01 -> UART MODE disabled / DOL present, no DCL
                  02 -> UART MODE disabled / no DOL , DCL present
                  03 -> UART MODE disabled / DOL present, DCL present
                  04 -> UART MODE enabled / no DOL, no DCL
                  05 -> UART MODE enabled / DOL present, no DCL
                  06 -> UART MODE enabled / no DOL, DCL present
                  07 -> UART MODE enabled / DOL present, DCL present

  14. #89

    Default

    My 1994 EEC-IV is configured for LINK_SW = 07 (hex), and yes it does have DCL present.
    When people find that pin #34 is not active, it is more than likely the bit in the zeroth position, the least significant bit is a 0, not a 1.

    I've recently ordered a really good condition Tripminder in working condition, and hopefully my EEC-IV has DOL on pin#34.
    If it is not on pin#34, I will test the other undocumented pins.

    I'll take some pictures once installed.

  15. #90

    Default

    Here is the actual strategy for DOL_PULSE_CALC_COM3

    Code:
       DOL_PULSE_CALC_COM3:
    47fc: b3,f0,03,18         ldb   R18,[Rf0+3]      R18 = LINK_SW;
    4800: 38,18,04            jb    B0,R18,4807      if (B0_R18 = 0)  {
    4803: 71,fd,d6            an2b  Rd6,fd           B1_Rd6 = 0;			# DOL not enabled, return
    4806: f0                  ret                    return; }
    
    
    4807: 91,02,d6            orb   Rd6,2            B1_Rd6 = 1;
    480a: af,f4,4b,32         ldzbw R32,[Rf4+4b]     wR32 = INJOUT;
    480e: a3,f5,96,00,30      ldw   R30,[Rf4+96]     R30 = PUL_PER_GAL;
    4813: ef,91,14            call  5ca7             Sub_5ca7 ();
    4816: a3,e6,60,30         ldw   R30,[Re6+60]     R30 = A0COR;
    481a: ef,8c,14            call  5ca9             Sub_5ca9 ();
    481d: b0,42,38            ldb   R38,R42          R38 = R42;
    4820: b1,10,39            ldb   R39,10           R39 = 10;
    4823: a0,32,36            ldw   R36,R32          R36 = R32;
    4826: a1,26,06,32         ldw   R32,626          R32 = 626;                        # stcf = Seconds to clock ticks conversion factor, ticks/second.
    482a: a1,73,cb,30         ldw   R30,cb73         R30 = cb73;
    482e: ef,76,14            call  5ca7             Sub_5ca7 ();
    4831: ef,9d,14            call  5cd1             Sub_5cd1 ();
    4834: a0,30,36            ldw   R36,R30          R36 = R30;
    4837: fa                  di                     interrupts OFF;
    4838: 01,32               clrw  R32              R32 = 0;
    483a: a3,e4,7c,30         ldw   R30,[Re4+7c]     R30 = FUEL_SUM_TKS;
    483e: 8c,36,30            divw  R30,R36          wR30 /= R36;
    4841: 4c,36,32,34         ml3w  R34,R32,R36      lR34 = wR32 * R36;
    4845: c3,e4,7c,36         stw   R36,[Re4+7c]     FUEL_SUM_TKS = R36;
    4849: 3f,30,10            jb    B7,R30,485c      if (B7_R30 = 0)  {
    484c: 09,01,30            shlw  R30,1            R30 <<= 1;                        #[ R30 *= 2] 
    484f: a3,e4,7e,32         ldw   R32,[Re4+7e]     R32 = DOL_COUNT;
    4853: 64,30,32            ad2w  R32,R30          R32 += R30;
    4856: c3,e4,7e,32         stw   R32,[Re4+7e]     DOL_COUNT = R32;
    485a: 20,07               sjmp  4863             goto 4863; }
    
    
    485c: bd,ff,30            ldsbw R30,ff           swR30 = ff;
    485f: c3,e4,7e,30         stw   R30,[Re4+7e]     DOL_COUNT = R30;
    4863: fb                  ei                     interrupts ON;
    4864: f0                  ret                    return;

  16. #91

    Default

    When connecting the DVM, using AC, did you connect negative to ground or signal ground?

    I have a cheap DVM that didn't pick up any Hz signal on pin 34?
    I didn't try AC, only Hz.
    Maybe signal so small my DVM doesn't pick it up?

  17. #92

    Default

    It's possible that your EEC doesn't have a driver chip for whatever output you have. I grabbed an EEC for an automatic 95 GT to go in my manual car reasoning that it would have the output drivers for the trans that I won't be using so hopefully the signal comes out one of those pins. But I never got back to that project.

    I'm guessing DCL is the live EEC data that late OBD-I Fords had?

    steve

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •